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Title: Soil properties and sediment accretion modulate methane fluxes from restored wetlands

Abstract

Wetlands are the largest source of methane (CH 4) globally, yet our understanding of how process-level controls scale to ecosystem fluxes remains limited. It is particularly uncertain how variable soil properties influence ecosystem CH 4 emissions on annual time scales. Here. we measured ecosystem carbon dioxide (CO 2) and CH 4 fluxes by eddy covariance from two wetlands recently restored on peat and alluvium soils within the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta of California. Annual CH 4 fluxes from the alluvium wetland were significantly lower than the peat site for multiple years following restoration, but these differences were not explained by variation in dominant climate drivers or productivity across wetlands. Soil iron (Fe) concentrations were significantly higher in alluvium soils, and alluvium CH 4 fluxes were decoupled from plant processes compared with the peat site, as expected when Fe reduction inhibits CH 4 production in the rhizosphere. Soil carbon content and CO 2 uptake rates did not vary across wetlands and, thus, could also be ruled out as drivers of initial CH 4 flux differences. Differences in wetland CH 4 fluxes across soil types were transient; alluvium wetland fluxes were similar to peat wetland fluxes 3 years after restoration. Changing alluvium CH 4more » emissions with time could not be explained by an empirical model based on dominant CH 4 flux biophysical drivers, suggesting that other factors, not measured by our eddy covariance towers, were responsible for these changes. Recently accreted alluvium soils were less acidic and contained more reduced Fe compared with the pre-restoration parent soils, suggesting that CH 4 emissions increased as conditions became more favorable to methanogenesis within wetland sediments. This study suggests that alluvium soil properties, likely Fe content, are capable of inhibiting ecosystem-scale wetland CH 4 flux, but these effects appear to be transient without continued input of alluvium to wetland sediments.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, Berkeley CA USA
  2. Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, California State University, East Bay, Hayward CA USA
  3. National Ecological Observatory Network, Battelle, Boulder CO USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1477371
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Global Change Biology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 24; Journal Issue: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 1354-1013
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Chamberlain, Samuel D., Anthony, Tyler L., Silver, Whendee L., Eichelmann, Elke, Hemes, Kyle S., Oikawa, Patricia Y., Sturtevant, Cove, Szutu, Daphne J., Verfaillie, Joseph G., and Baldocchi, Dennis D. Soil properties and sediment accretion modulate methane fluxes from restored wetlands. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1111/gcb.14124.
Chamberlain, Samuel D., Anthony, Tyler L., Silver, Whendee L., Eichelmann, Elke, Hemes, Kyle S., Oikawa, Patricia Y., Sturtevant, Cove, Szutu, Daphne J., Verfaillie, Joseph G., & Baldocchi, Dennis D. Soil properties and sediment accretion modulate methane fluxes from restored wetlands. United States. doi:10.1111/gcb.14124.
Chamberlain, Samuel D., Anthony, Tyler L., Silver, Whendee L., Eichelmann, Elke, Hemes, Kyle S., Oikawa, Patricia Y., Sturtevant, Cove, Szutu, Daphne J., Verfaillie, Joseph G., and Baldocchi, Dennis D. Tue . "Soil properties and sediment accretion modulate methane fluxes from restored wetlands". United States. doi:10.1111/gcb.14124. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1477371.
@article{osti_1477371,
title = {Soil properties and sediment accretion modulate methane fluxes from restored wetlands},
author = {Chamberlain, Samuel D. and Anthony, Tyler L. and Silver, Whendee L. and Eichelmann, Elke and Hemes, Kyle S. and Oikawa, Patricia Y. and Sturtevant, Cove and Szutu, Daphne J. and Verfaillie, Joseph G. and Baldocchi, Dennis D.},
abstractNote = {Wetlands are the largest source of methane (CH4) globally, yet our understanding of how process-level controls scale to ecosystem fluxes remains limited. It is particularly uncertain how variable soil properties influence ecosystem CH4 emissions on annual time scales. Here. we measured ecosystem carbon dioxide (CO2) and CH4 fluxes by eddy covariance from two wetlands recently restored on peat and alluvium soils within the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta of California. Annual CH4 fluxes from the alluvium wetland were significantly lower than the peat site for multiple years following restoration, but these differences were not explained by variation in dominant climate drivers or productivity across wetlands. Soil iron (Fe) concentrations were significantly higher in alluvium soils, and alluvium CH4 fluxes were decoupled from plant processes compared with the peat site, as expected when Fe reduction inhibits CH4 production in the rhizosphere. Soil carbon content and CO2 uptake rates did not vary across wetlands and, thus, could also be ruled out as drivers of initial CH4 flux differences. Differences in wetland CH4 fluxes across soil types were transient; alluvium wetland fluxes were similar to peat wetland fluxes 3 years after restoration. Changing alluvium CH4 emissions with time could not be explained by an empirical model based on dominant CH4 flux biophysical drivers, suggesting that other factors, not measured by our eddy covariance towers, were responsible for these changes. Recently accreted alluvium soils were less acidic and contained more reduced Fe compared with the pre-restoration parent soils, suggesting that CH4 emissions increased as conditions became more favorable to methanogenesis within wetland sediments. This study suggests that alluvium soil properties, likely Fe content, are capable of inhibiting ecosystem-scale wetland CH4 flux, but these effects appear to be transient without continued input of alluvium to wetland sediments.},
doi = {10.1111/gcb.14124},
journal = {Global Change Biology},
number = 9,
volume = 24,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}

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