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Title: Monitoring multicomponent transport using in situ ATR FTIR spectroscopy

Membranes are a critical component of many energy generation and storage technologies, including artificial photosynthesis systems that reduce atmospheric CO 2 to high-value products. In this study, we used in situ ATR FTIR spectroscopy to monitor the crossover of three commonly-reported CO 2 reduction products—methanol, sodium formate, and sodium acetate—through Nafion ®117, a common cation exchange membrane. Measurement errors for the permeation of mixtures of solutes are discussed. Permeabilities from one-, two-, and three-solute mixed aqueous solutions were measured using a standard diffusion cell, and ATR FTIR spectra were used to obtain time-resolved concentration data that were fit to a model describing transport of ions and small molecules through hydrated polymer films. The permeability of Nafion ®117 to methanol measured using this methodology was in agreement with literature reports. The sorption of methanol, sodium formate, and sodium acetate, and mixtures thereof, were measured using a desorption technique. From the measured permeabilities and solubilities, diffusivities of each solute were calculated. In conclusion, differences in permeability among the solutes were found to be primarily due to differences in their solubility in Nafion ®117.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Auburn Univ., Auburn, AL (United States)
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)
  3. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Membrane Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 550; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0376-7388
Publisher:
Elsevier
Research Org:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22). Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; Permeability; Multicomponent transport; Artificial photosynthesis; In situ ATR FTIR spectroscopy
OSTI Identifier:
1477270

Beckingham, Bryan S., Lynd, Nathaniel A., and Miller, Daniel J.. Monitoring multicomponent transport using in situ ATR FTIR spectroscopy. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1016/j.memsci.2017.12.072.
Beckingham, Bryan S., Lynd, Nathaniel A., & Miller, Daniel J.. Monitoring multicomponent transport using in situ ATR FTIR spectroscopy. United States. doi:10.1016/j.memsci.2017.12.072.
Beckingham, Bryan S., Lynd, Nathaniel A., and Miller, Daniel J.. 2017. "Monitoring multicomponent transport using in situ ATR FTIR spectroscopy". United States. doi:10.1016/j.memsci.2017.12.072. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1477270.
@article{osti_1477270,
title = {Monitoring multicomponent transport using in situ ATR FTIR spectroscopy},
author = {Beckingham, Bryan S. and Lynd, Nathaniel A. and Miller, Daniel J.},
abstractNote = {Membranes are a critical component of many energy generation and storage technologies, including artificial photosynthesis systems that reduce atmospheric CO2 to high-value products. In this study, we used in situ ATR FTIR spectroscopy to monitor the crossover of three commonly-reported CO2 reduction products—methanol, sodium formate, and sodium acetate—through Nafion®117, a common cation exchange membrane. Measurement errors for the permeation of mixtures of solutes are discussed. Permeabilities from one-, two-, and three-solute mixed aqueous solutions were measured using a standard diffusion cell, and ATR FTIR spectra were used to obtain time-resolved concentration data that were fit to a model describing transport of ions and small molecules through hydrated polymer films. The permeability of Nafion®117 to methanol measured using this methodology was in agreement with literature reports. The sorption of methanol, sodium formate, and sodium acetate, and mixtures thereof, were measured using a desorption technique. From the measured permeabilities and solubilities, diffusivities of each solute were calculated. In conclusion, differences in permeability among the solutes were found to be primarily due to differences in their solubility in Nafion®117.},
doi = {10.1016/j.memsci.2017.12.072},
journal = {Journal of Membrane Science},
number = C,
volume = 550,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}