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Title: X-ray diffraction and heterogeneous materials: An adaptive crystallography approach

Abstract

Cultural heritage materials are often complex and heterogeneous, with a multi-scale architecture. Phases from a variety of crystalline forms co-exist in a wide grain size distribution, with each of these phases keeping in their structural arrangement a memory of the transformations that occurred to the material. Over the last two decades, X-ray diffraction has been applied successfully to the study of cultural heritage materials, with the use of synchrotron facilities offering new possibilities to describe the structural features of such complex materials. The long-range and/or short-range organization of the different crystallographic phases as well as their global position/dispersion in the material are closely related to the properties of the material (optical, mechanical…), its manufacturing process, functionality, or long-term conservation. In this paper, possible diffraction setups and data collection strategies are discussed in order to retrieve adequate data from crystalline and amorphous phases and to take into account single-crystal contributions.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [1]
  1. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)
  2. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble (France)
  3. Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble (France)
  4. CEMES, Toulouse (France)
  5. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1477263
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Comptes Rendus. Physique
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 19; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 1631-0705
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Cultural heritage; Heterogeneous materials; X-ray diffraction; Crystalline phases; Amorphous phases; Synchrotron

Citation Formats

Dejoie, Catherine, Autran, Pierre -Olivier, Bordet, Pierre, Fitch, Andy N., Martinetto, Pauline, Sciau, Philippe, Tamura, Nobumichi, and Wright, Jonathan. X-ray diffraction and heterogeneous materials: An adaptive crystallography approach. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.crhy.2018.09.001.
Dejoie, Catherine, Autran, Pierre -Olivier, Bordet, Pierre, Fitch, Andy N., Martinetto, Pauline, Sciau, Philippe, Tamura, Nobumichi, & Wright, Jonathan. X-ray diffraction and heterogeneous materials: An adaptive crystallography approach. United States. doi:10.1016/j.crhy.2018.09.001.
Dejoie, Catherine, Autran, Pierre -Olivier, Bordet, Pierre, Fitch, Andy N., Martinetto, Pauline, Sciau, Philippe, Tamura, Nobumichi, and Wright, Jonathan. Thu . "X-ray diffraction and heterogeneous materials: An adaptive crystallography approach". United States. doi:10.1016/j.crhy.2018.09.001. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1477263.
@article{osti_1477263,
title = {X-ray diffraction and heterogeneous materials: An adaptive crystallography approach},
author = {Dejoie, Catherine and Autran, Pierre -Olivier and Bordet, Pierre and Fitch, Andy N. and Martinetto, Pauline and Sciau, Philippe and Tamura, Nobumichi and Wright, Jonathan},
abstractNote = {Cultural heritage materials are often complex and heterogeneous, with a multi-scale architecture. Phases from a variety of crystalline forms co-exist in a wide grain size distribution, with each of these phases keeping in their structural arrangement a memory of the transformations that occurred to the material. Over the last two decades, X-ray diffraction has been applied successfully to the study of cultural heritage materials, with the use of synchrotron facilities offering new possibilities to describe the structural features of such complex materials. The long-range and/or short-range organization of the different crystallographic phases as well as their global position/dispersion in the material are closely related to the properties of the material (optical, mechanical…), its manufacturing process, functionality, or long-term conservation. In this paper, possible diffraction setups and data collection strategies are discussed in order to retrieve adequate data from crystalline and amorphous phases and to take into account single-crystal contributions.},
doi = {10.1016/j.crhy.2018.09.001},
journal = {Comptes Rendus. Physique},
number = 7,
volume = 19,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}

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