skip to main content

DOE PAGESDOE PAGES

Title: Evaluation of trace elements in U.S. coals using the USGS COALQUAL database version 3.0. Part II: Non-REY critical elements

Coal is a potential source of some valuable elements. In this work, concentrations of 25 critical elements in U.S. coals were evaluated using the COALQUAL Database Version 3.0 aiming to identify best coal sources for potential recovery of critical element. A method was proposed to calculate the mean concentrations of critical elements in U.S. coals, including Li (11.5 ppm), Be (1.9 ppm), Ti (721 ppm), V (21.6 ppm), Mn (50.8 ppm), Co (4.5 ppm), Ga (5.1 ppm), Ge (7.2p pm), Se (2.4 ppm), Zr (30.4 ppm), Nb (3.3 ppm), Sn (1.8 ppm), Sb (1.0 ppm), Ba (266 ppm), Hf (0.77 ppm), and Ta (0.19 ppm).Based on the calculated mean concentrations, a rough estimate indicates that U.S. coals contain a large amount of critical elements that are enough to meet U.S. demands for many years to come, if these elements can be commercially extracted. By comparing with the suggested cut-off grades, we found that 5.8% of the coal samples have Ga concentrations higher than the suggested cut-off grade. The percentages of promising coal samples (higher than cut-off grades) of other elements are below 3%. Results further indicate that despite some variations among elements, bituminous coals from the Appalachian region are likelymore » to have high concentrations of Li, Ga, Be, Se, and Sb which make them a potential source of these critical elements. Bituminous coals from the Interior Coal Province, both Eastern and Western, were found to have relatively high probabilities of having high Ge concentrations. Furthermore very limited coal samples were found from mixed regions to have V and Zr concentrations higher than the corresponding suggested cut-off grades.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [1]
  1. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)
Publication Date:
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Coal Geology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 192; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0166-5162
Publisher:
Elsevier
Research Org:
National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; REE; coal database; Coal quality; COALQUAL database; Critical elements; Trace elements; U.S. coals
OSTI Identifier:
1477003

Lin, Ronghong, Soong, Yee, and Granite, Evan J. Evaluation of trace elements in U.S. coals using the USGS COALQUAL database version 3.0. Part II: Non-REY critical elements. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1016/j.coal.2018.04.005.
Lin, Ronghong, Soong, Yee, & Granite, Evan J. Evaluation of trace elements in U.S. coals using the USGS COALQUAL database version 3.0. Part II: Non-REY critical elements. United States. doi:10.1016/j.coal.2018.04.005.
Lin, Ronghong, Soong, Yee, and Granite, Evan J. 2018. "Evaluation of trace elements in U.S. coals using the USGS COALQUAL database version 3.0. Part II: Non-REY critical elements". United States. doi:10.1016/j.coal.2018.04.005. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1477003.
@article{osti_1477003,
title = {Evaluation of trace elements in U.S. coals using the USGS COALQUAL database version 3.0. Part II: Non-REY critical elements},
author = {Lin, Ronghong and Soong, Yee and Granite, Evan J.},
abstractNote = {Coal is a potential source of some valuable elements. In this work, concentrations of 25 critical elements in U.S. coals were evaluated using the COALQUAL Database Version 3.0 aiming to identify best coal sources for potential recovery of critical element. A method was proposed to calculate the mean concentrations of critical elements in U.S. coals, including Li (11.5 ppm), Be (1.9 ppm), Ti (721 ppm), V (21.6 ppm), Mn (50.8 ppm), Co (4.5 ppm), Ga (5.1 ppm), Ge (7.2p pm), Se (2.4 ppm), Zr (30.4 ppm), Nb (3.3 ppm), Sn (1.8 ppm), Sb (1.0 ppm), Ba (266 ppm), Hf (0.77 ppm), and Ta (0.19 ppm).Based on the calculated mean concentrations, a rough estimate indicates that U.S. coals contain a large amount of critical elements that are enough to meet U.S. demands for many years to come, if these elements can be commercially extracted. By comparing with the suggested cut-off grades, we found that 5.8% of the coal samples have Ga concentrations higher than the suggested cut-off grade. The percentages of promising coal samples (higher than cut-off grades) of other elements are below 3%. Results further indicate that despite some variations among elements, bituminous coals from the Appalachian region are likely to have high concentrations of Li, Ga, Be, Se, and Sb which make them a potential source of these critical elements. Bituminous coals from the Interior Coal Province, both Eastern and Western, were found to have relatively high probabilities of having high Ge concentrations. Furthermore very limited coal samples were found from mixed regions to have V and Zr concentrations higher than the corresponding suggested cut-off grades.},
doi = {10.1016/j.coal.2018.04.005},
journal = {International Journal of Coal Geology},
number = C,
volume = 192,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}