skip to main content

DOE PAGESDOE PAGES

This content will become publicly available on April 12, 2019

Title: Design and implementation of a shearing apparatus for the experimental study of shear displacement in rocks

Fluid flow in the subsurface is not well understood in the context of “impermeable” geologic media. This is especially true of formations that have undergone significant stress fluctuations due to injection or withdrawal of fluids that alters the localized pressure regime. When the pressure regime is altered, these formations, which are often already fractured, move via shear to reduce the imbalance in the stress state. While this process is known to happen, the evolution of these fractures and their effects on fluid transport are still relatively unknown. Numerous simulation and several experimental studies have been performed that characterize the relationship between shearing and permeability in fractures; while many of these studies utilize measurements of fluid flow or the starting and ending geometries of the fracture to characterize shear, they do not characterize the intermediate stages during shear. We present an experimental apparatus based on slight modifications to a commonly available Hassler core holder that allows for shearing of rocks, while measuring the hydraulic and mechanical changes to geomaterials during intermediate steps. The core holder modification employs the use of semi-circular end caps and structural supports for the confining membrane that allow for free movement of the sheared material while preventingmore » membrane collapse. By integrating this modified core holder with a computed tomography scanner, we show a new methodology for understanding the interdependent behavior between fracture structure and flow properties during intermediate steps in shearing. Here, we include a case study of this device function which is shown here through shearing of a fractured shale core and simultaneous observation of the mechanical changes and evolution of the hydraulic properties during shearing.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ;  [1]
  1. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); AECOM, Morgantown, WV (United States)
  2. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
FE0004000
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Review of Scientific Instruments
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 89; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Research Org:
National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; shearing; CT scanning
OSTI Identifier:
1476991
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1432911

Moore, Johnathan, Crandall, Dustin, Gill, Magdalena, Brown, Sarah, and Tennant, Bryan. Design and implementation of a shearing apparatus for the experimental study of shear displacement in rocks. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1063/1.5018419.
Moore, Johnathan, Crandall, Dustin, Gill, Magdalena, Brown, Sarah, & Tennant, Bryan. Design and implementation of a shearing apparatus for the experimental study of shear displacement in rocks. United States. doi:10.1063/1.5018419.
Moore, Johnathan, Crandall, Dustin, Gill, Magdalena, Brown, Sarah, and Tennant, Bryan. 2018. "Design and implementation of a shearing apparatus for the experimental study of shear displacement in rocks". United States. doi:10.1063/1.5018419.
@article{osti_1476991,
title = {Design and implementation of a shearing apparatus for the experimental study of shear displacement in rocks},
author = {Moore, Johnathan and Crandall, Dustin and Gill, Magdalena and Brown, Sarah and Tennant, Bryan},
abstractNote = {Fluid flow in the subsurface is not well understood in the context of “impermeable” geologic media. This is especially true of formations that have undergone significant stress fluctuations due to injection or withdrawal of fluids that alters the localized pressure regime. When the pressure regime is altered, these formations, which are often already fractured, move via shear to reduce the imbalance in the stress state. While this process is known to happen, the evolution of these fractures and their effects on fluid transport are still relatively unknown. Numerous simulation and several experimental studies have been performed that characterize the relationship between shearing and permeability in fractures; while many of these studies utilize measurements of fluid flow or the starting and ending geometries of the fracture to characterize shear, they do not characterize the intermediate stages during shear. We present an experimental apparatus based on slight modifications to a commonly available Hassler core holder that allows for shearing of rocks, while measuring the hydraulic and mechanical changes to geomaterials during intermediate steps. The core holder modification employs the use of semi-circular end caps and structural supports for the confining membrane that allow for free movement of the sheared material while preventing membrane collapse. By integrating this modified core holder with a computed tomography scanner, we show a new methodology for understanding the interdependent behavior between fracture structure and flow properties during intermediate steps in shearing. Here, we include a case study of this device function which is shown here through shearing of a fractured shale core and simultaneous observation of the mechanical changes and evolution of the hydraulic properties during shearing.},
doi = {10.1063/1.5018419},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 4,
volume = 89,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}