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Title: Optimal blending management of biomass resources used for biochemical conversion

This research develops an optimization model to describe the tradeoff among blend components in the least-cost biomass blend, based on resource availability, quality requirements, and logistics cost for a biochemical conversion. A mixed-integer linear programming model is developed to determine the least-cost blend from a set of candidate feedstocks. A case study – based on a biorefinery located in western Kansas that uses three-pass corn stover, two-pass corn stover, switchgrass, miscanthus, and municipal solid waste fractions to meet biochemical conversion specifications and feedstock demand – shows that the delivered cost of an optimal blend that meets carbohydrate and ash specifications is 12.12% higher than the delivered cost of optimal blend that meets a carbohydrate specification only. The results indicate that a least-cost blend that meets both carbohydrate and ash specifications consists of miscanthus (48.2%) and switchgrass (29.4%) whereas the least-cost blend meeting carbohydrate specification only comprises three-pass corn stover (55.4%) and two-pass corn stover (20.4%). Here an optimal blend uses a low-cost municipal solid waste fraction in all cases, implying that blending could be a potential strategy to reduce delivered feedstock cost.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
INL/JOU-17-42765-Rev000
Journal ID: ISSN 1932-104X
Grant/Contract Number:
AC07-05ID14517
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Biofuels, Bioproducts & Biorefining
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 1932-104X
Publisher:
Wiley
Research Org:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; blending; feedstock; optimization; biochemical conversion; biomass; mixed-integer linear programming
OSTI Identifier:
1476911
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1432135

Roni, Mohammad S., Thompson, David N., Hartley, Damon S., Searcy, Erin M., and Nguyen, Quang A.. Optimal blending management of biomass resources used for biochemical conversion. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1002/bbb.1877.
Roni, Mohammad S., Thompson, David N., Hartley, Damon S., Searcy, Erin M., & Nguyen, Quang A.. Optimal blending management of biomass resources used for biochemical conversion. United States. doi:10.1002/bbb.1877.
Roni, Mohammad S., Thompson, David N., Hartley, Damon S., Searcy, Erin M., and Nguyen, Quang A.. 2018. "Optimal blending management of biomass resources used for biochemical conversion". United States. doi:10.1002/bbb.1877.
@article{osti_1476911,
title = {Optimal blending management of biomass resources used for biochemical conversion},
author = {Roni, Mohammad S. and Thompson, David N. and Hartley, Damon S. and Searcy, Erin M. and Nguyen, Quang A.},
abstractNote = {This research develops an optimization model to describe the tradeoff among blend components in the least-cost biomass blend, based on resource availability, quality requirements, and logistics cost for a biochemical conversion. A mixed-integer linear programming model is developed to determine the least-cost blend from a set of candidate feedstocks. A case study – based on a biorefinery located in western Kansas that uses three-pass corn stover, two-pass corn stover, switchgrass, miscanthus, and municipal solid waste fractions to meet biochemical conversion specifications and feedstock demand – shows that the delivered cost of an optimal blend that meets carbohydrate and ash specifications is 12.12% higher than the delivered cost of optimal blend that meets a carbohydrate specification only. The results indicate that a least-cost blend that meets both carbohydrate and ash specifications consists of miscanthus (48.2%) and switchgrass (29.4%) whereas the least-cost blend meeting carbohydrate specification only comprises three-pass corn stover (55.4%) and two-pass corn stover (20.4%). Here an optimal blend uses a low-cost municipal solid waste fraction in all cases, implying that blending could be a potential strategy to reduce delivered feedstock cost.},
doi = {10.1002/bbb.1877},
journal = {Biofuels, Bioproducts & Biorefining},
number = 4,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}