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Title: Gas adsorption properties of ZSM-5 zeolites heated to extreme temperatures

Zeolites are broadly useful catalysts and molecular sieve adsorbents for purification. In this paper the thermal degradations of bare and platinum-loaded ZSM-5 was studied with the goal of understanding the behavior of nanoporous solids at extreme temperatures comparable to those present in nuclear fuels. Zeolites were heated in air and nitrogen at temperatures up to 1500 °C, and then characterized for thermal stability via X-ray diffraction (XRD) and for gas adsorption by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were also employed. These results indicate zeolites are stable when heat-treated up to 800 °C and degrade slowly at higher temperatures. However, significant surface area degradation begins at 1025–1150 °C with an activation energy of 400 kJ/mole. At 1500 °C, gas adsorption measurements and SEM images show complete collapse of the porous structure. Finally, critically for nuclear fuel applications, however, the zeolites still adsorb helium in significant quantities.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [2] ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering
  2. Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
  3. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-699144
Journal ID: ISSN 0272-8842; 829006
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344; NE0000704
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Ceramics International
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 14; Journal ID: ISSN 0272-8842
Publisher:
Elsevier
Research Org:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; nanoporous solids; surface area degradation; pore collapse; extreme temperatures; gas adsorption; helium adsorption
OSTI Identifier:
1476191
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1358917

Pérez-Page, María, Makel, James, Guan, Kelly, Zhang, Shenli, Tringe, Joseph, Castro, Ricardo H. R., and Stroeve, Pieter. Gas adsorption properties of ZSM-5 zeolites heated to extreme temperatures. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1016/j.ceramint.2016.06.193.
Pérez-Page, María, Makel, James, Guan, Kelly, Zhang, Shenli, Tringe, Joseph, Castro, Ricardo H. R., & Stroeve, Pieter. Gas adsorption properties of ZSM-5 zeolites heated to extreme temperatures. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ceramint.2016.06.193.
Pérez-Page, María, Makel, James, Guan, Kelly, Zhang, Shenli, Tringe, Joseph, Castro, Ricardo H. R., and Stroeve, Pieter. 2016. "Gas adsorption properties of ZSM-5 zeolites heated to extreme temperatures". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ceramint.2016.06.193. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1476191.
@article{osti_1476191,
title = {Gas adsorption properties of ZSM-5 zeolites heated to extreme temperatures},
author = {Pérez-Page, María and Makel, James and Guan, Kelly and Zhang, Shenli and Tringe, Joseph and Castro, Ricardo H. R. and Stroeve, Pieter},
abstractNote = {Zeolites are broadly useful catalysts and molecular sieve adsorbents for purification. In this paper the thermal degradations of bare and platinum-loaded ZSM-5 was studied with the goal of understanding the behavior of nanoporous solids at extreme temperatures comparable to those present in nuclear fuels. Zeolites were heated in air and nitrogen at temperatures up to 1500 °C, and then characterized for thermal stability via X-ray diffraction (XRD) and for gas adsorption by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were also employed. These results indicate zeolites are stable when heat-treated up to 800 °C and degrade slowly at higher temperatures. However, significant surface area degradation begins at 1025–1150 °C with an activation energy of 400 kJ/mole. At 1500 °C, gas adsorption measurements and SEM images show complete collapse of the porous structure. Finally, critically for nuclear fuel applications, however, the zeolites still adsorb helium in significant quantities.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ceramint.2016.06.193},
journal = {Ceramics International},
number = 14,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {6}
}