skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

This content will become publicly available on September 28, 2019

Title: Reactive flow modeling of the polymer bonded explosive LX-17 double shock experiments

Abstract

Overdriven double shock experiments provide a measurement of the properties of the reaction product states of the 1-3-5-triamino-2-4-6trinitrobenzene-based explosive LX-17. These experiments used two flyer materials mounted on the end of a projectile to send an initial shock through the LX-17, followed by a second shock of a higher magnitude into the detonation products. The experimental results are compared to 2D reactive flow modeling. A reactive flow model that describes only the kinetics of the LX-17 decomposition fails to accurately reproduce the decay of the first shock or the curvature or strength of the second shock. A new model is proposed in which the carbon condensate produced in the reaction zone is controlled by a kinetic rate. This allows the carbon condensate to be initially out of chemical equilibrium with the product gas. Finally, this new model reproduces the initial detonation peak and decay and matches the curvature of the second shock; however, it still over-predicts the strength of the second shock.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1476190
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-747438
Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8979; 931124
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Applied Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 124; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8979
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; von Neumann spike; chemical equilibrium; explosives; chemical reaction dynamics; shock waves; chemical elements; carbon based materials; chemical kinetics and dynamics; chemically reactive flows

Citation Formats

Rehagen, Thomas J., Vitello, Peter, Bastea, Sorin, and Fried, Laurence E. Reactive flow modeling of the polymer bonded explosive LX-17 double shock experiments. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1063/1.5029740.
Rehagen, Thomas J., Vitello, Peter, Bastea, Sorin, & Fried, Laurence E. Reactive flow modeling of the polymer bonded explosive LX-17 double shock experiments. United States. doi:10.1063/1.5029740.
Rehagen, Thomas J., Vitello, Peter, Bastea, Sorin, and Fried, Laurence E. Fri . "Reactive flow modeling of the polymer bonded explosive LX-17 double shock experiments". United States. doi:10.1063/1.5029740.
@article{osti_1476190,
title = {Reactive flow modeling of the polymer bonded explosive LX-17 double shock experiments},
author = {Rehagen, Thomas J. and Vitello, Peter and Bastea, Sorin and Fried, Laurence E.},
abstractNote = {Overdriven double shock experiments provide a measurement of the properties of the reaction product states of the 1-3-5-triamino-2-4-6trinitrobenzene-based explosive LX-17. These experiments used two flyer materials mounted on the end of a projectile to send an initial shock through the LX-17, followed by a second shock of a higher magnitude into the detonation products. The experimental results are compared to 2D reactive flow modeling. A reactive flow model that describes only the kinetics of the LX-17 decomposition fails to accurately reproduce the decay of the first shock or the curvature or strength of the second shock. A new model is proposed in which the carbon condensate produced in the reaction zone is controlled by a kinetic rate. This allows the carbon condensate to be initially out of chemical equilibrium with the product gas. Finally, this new model reproduces the initial detonation peak and decay and matches the curvature of the second shock; however, it still over-predicts the strength of the second shock.},
doi = {10.1063/1.5029740},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 12,
volume = 124,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on September 28, 2019
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share: