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Title: DNA-Encoded Protein Janus Nanoparticles

Abstract

Asymmetric functionality and directional interactions, which are characteristic of noncentrosymmetric particles, such as Janus particles, present an opportunity to encode particles with properties, but also a great synthetic challenge. Here, we exploit the chemical anisotropy of proteins, and the versatile chemistry of DNA to synthesize a protein-based Janus nanoparticle comprised of two proteins encoded with sequence-specific nucleic acid domains, tethered together by an interprotein “DNA bond”. We use these novel nanoparticles to realize a new class of three-dimensional superlattice, only possible when two sides of the particle are modified with orthogonal oligonucleotide sequences. The low symmetry, intrinsic to Janus particles, enables the realization of unprecedented multicomponent nanoparticle superlattices with unique, hexagonal layered architectures. In addition, the interprotein “DNA bond” can be modulated to selectively expand the lattice in a single direction. The results presented herein not only emphasize the power of rationally designing nanoscale building blocks to create highly engineered colloidal crystals, but also establish a precedent for applications of multidomain DNA-encoded nanoparticles, especially in the field of colloidal crystallization.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry, and International Inst. for Nanotechnology
  2. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). X-ray Science Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada; US Department of the Navy, Office of Naval Research (ONR); USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1475554
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357; N00014-15-1-0043
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of the American Chemical Society
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 140; Journal Issue: 29; Journal ID: ISSN 0002-7863
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Hayes, Oliver G., McMillan, Janet R., Lee, Byeongdu, and Mirkin, Chad A. DNA-Encoded Protein Janus Nanoparticles. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1021/jacs.8b05640.
Hayes, Oliver G., McMillan, Janet R., Lee, Byeongdu, & Mirkin, Chad A. DNA-Encoded Protein Janus Nanoparticles. United States. doi:10.1021/jacs.8b05640.
Hayes, Oliver G., McMillan, Janet R., Lee, Byeongdu, and Mirkin, Chad A. Sun . "DNA-Encoded Protein Janus Nanoparticles". United States. doi:10.1021/jacs.8b05640. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1475554.
@article{osti_1475554,
title = {DNA-Encoded Protein Janus Nanoparticles},
author = {Hayes, Oliver G. and McMillan, Janet R. and Lee, Byeongdu and Mirkin, Chad A.},
abstractNote = {Asymmetric functionality and directional interactions, which are characteristic of noncentrosymmetric particles, such as Janus particles, present an opportunity to encode particles with properties, but also a great synthetic challenge. Here, we exploit the chemical anisotropy of proteins, and the versatile chemistry of DNA to synthesize a protein-based Janus nanoparticle comprised of two proteins encoded with sequence-specific nucleic acid domains, tethered together by an interprotein “DNA bond”. We use these novel nanoparticles to realize a new class of three-dimensional superlattice, only possible when two sides of the particle are modified with orthogonal oligonucleotide sequences. The low symmetry, intrinsic to Janus particles, enables the realization of unprecedented multicomponent nanoparticle superlattices with unique, hexagonal layered architectures. In addition, the interprotein “DNA bond” can be modulated to selectively expand the lattice in a single direction. The results presented herein not only emphasize the power of rationally designing nanoscale building blocks to create highly engineered colloidal crystals, but also establish a precedent for applications of multidomain DNA-encoded nanoparticles, especially in the field of colloidal crystallization.},
doi = {10.1021/jacs.8b05640},
journal = {Journal of the American Chemical Society},
number = 29,
volume = 140,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {6}
}

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Cited by: 4 works
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