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Title: Description of the code ANVIL (ANisotropic Vhf Impulse Location)

Abstract

In this paper, we have developed a general, three-dimensional method to locate sources of earth-directed radiation which takes into account the flight paths of reflected signals. While time-of-arrival algorithms exist for locating radio sources using line-of-sight propagation paths, radio sources originating above the surface of the earth will not necessarily emit strong power along direct paths to satellites. A combination of direct and ground-reflected pulses or only ground-reflected signals from such sources could be received by satellite-borne sensors. The work presented here applies to satellite detection of sub-ionospheric radio sources in a vacuum environment with ideal reflection off the earth's surface. Because satellites are not static receivers, their configuration with respect to a radio source is not always optimal. Therefore, a statistical study is performed using 1000 randomized configurations of 24 satellites in middle earth orbit. For each configuration, the radio source latitude and longitude is fixed, and its altitude is varied from 1 to 97 km. An analytic direct-path algorithm using the five satellites nearest the radio source provides an initial guess for the radio source latitude and longitude. We find that, using this approximation, the mean error in the calculated nadir location has a maximum value of 134more » m for the 97-km source altitude. The coordinates of the initial guess are used to define the origin of a grid within which an all-points search refinement is performed. Finally, using this procedure, the overall maximum mean error in radio source position is found to be on the order of the computational grid size.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)
  2. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1475342
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1477798
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-18-23924
Journal ID: ISSN 0048-6604
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Radio Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 53; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 0048-6604
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; satellite; geolocation of radio sources; reflection; TOA; radio

Citation Formats

Ortiz, Alexander E., and Morris, Heidi E.. Description of the code ANVIL (ANisotropic Vhf Impulse Location). United States: N. p., 2018. Web. https://doi.org/10.1029/2018RS006626.
Ortiz, Alexander E., & Morris, Heidi E.. Description of the code ANVIL (ANisotropic Vhf Impulse Location). United States. https://doi.org/10.1029/2018RS006626
Ortiz, Alexander E., and Morris, Heidi E.. Fri . "Description of the code ANVIL (ANisotropic Vhf Impulse Location)". United States. https://doi.org/10.1029/2018RS006626. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1475342.
@article{osti_1475342,
title = {Description of the code ANVIL (ANisotropic Vhf Impulse Location)},
author = {Ortiz, Alexander E. and Morris, Heidi E.},
abstractNote = {In this paper, we have developed a general, three-dimensional method to locate sources of earth-directed radiation which takes into account the flight paths of reflected signals. While time-of-arrival algorithms exist for locating radio sources using line-of-sight propagation paths, radio sources originating above the surface of the earth will not necessarily emit strong power along direct paths to satellites. A combination of direct and ground-reflected pulses or only ground-reflected signals from such sources could be received by satellite-borne sensors. The work presented here applies to satellite detection of sub-ionospheric radio sources in a vacuum environment with ideal reflection off the earth's surface. Because satellites are not static receivers, their configuration with respect to a radio source is not always optimal. Therefore, a statistical study is performed using 1000 randomized configurations of 24 satellites in middle earth orbit. For each configuration, the radio source latitude and longitude is fixed, and its altitude is varied from 1 to 97 km. An analytic direct-path algorithm using the five satellites nearest the radio source provides an initial guess for the radio source latitude and longitude. We find that, using this approximation, the mean error in the calculated nadir location has a maximum value of 134 m for the 97-km source altitude. The coordinates of the initial guess are used to define the origin of a grid within which an all-points search refinement is performed. Finally, using this procedure, the overall maximum mean error in radio source position is found to be on the order of the computational grid size.},
doi = {10.1029/2018RS006626},
journal = {Radio Science},
number = 10,
volume = 53,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Figures / Tables:

Table 1 Table 1: This table shows statistics for our study employing the KS method to obtain an initial guess for the radio-source coordinates. For each radio-source altitude, 1000 pseudo-random satellite con gurations are considered.

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    Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.