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Title: P and S wave responses of bacterial biopolymer formation in unconsolidated porous media

This study investigated the P and S wave responses and permeability reduction during bacterial biopolymer formation in unconsolidated porous media. Column experiments with fine sands, where the model bacteria Leuconostoc mesenteroides were stimulated to produce insoluble biopolymer, were conducted while monitoring changes in permeability and P and S wave responses. The bacterial biopolymer reduced the permeability by more than 1 order of magnitude, occupying ~10% pore volume after 38 days of growth. This substantial reduction was attributed to the bacterial biopolymer with complex internal structures accumulated at pore throats. S wave velocity (V S) increased by more than ~50% during biopolymer accumulation; this indicated that the bacterial biopolymer caused a certain level of stiffening effect on shear modulus of the unconsolidated sediment matrix at low confining stress conditions. Whereas replacing pore water by insoluble biopolymer was observed to cause minimal changes in P wave velocity (VP) due to the low elastic moduli of insoluble biopolymer. The spectral ratio analyses revealed that the biopolymer formation caused a ~50-80% increase in P wave attenuation (1/Q P) at the both ultrasonic and subultrasonic frequency ranges, at hundreds of kHz and tens of kHz, respectively, and a ~50-60% increase in S wave attenuation (1/Qmore » S) in the frequency band of several kHz. Our results reveal that in situ biopolymer formation and the resulting permeability reduction can be effectively monitored by using P and S wave attenuation in the ultrasonic and subultrasonic frequency ranges. Finally, this suggests that field monitoring using seismic logging techniques, including time-lapse dipole sonic logging, may be possible.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [3]
  1. Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Daejeon (South Korea). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Geosciences Division
  3. Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research. Biogeosciences
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 121; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 2169-8953
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Research Org:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1474930

Noh, Dong-Hwa, Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B., Kwon, Tae-Hyuk, and Muhunthan, Balasingam. P and S wave responses of bacterial biopolymer formation in unconsolidated porous media. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1002/2015JG003118.
Noh, Dong-Hwa, Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B., Kwon, Tae-Hyuk, & Muhunthan, Balasingam. P and S wave responses of bacterial biopolymer formation in unconsolidated porous media. United States. doi:10.1002/2015JG003118.
Noh, Dong-Hwa, Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B., Kwon, Tae-Hyuk, and Muhunthan, Balasingam. 2016. "P and S wave responses of bacterial biopolymer formation in unconsolidated porous media". United States. doi:10.1002/2015JG003118. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1474930.
@article{osti_1474930,
title = {P and S wave responses of bacterial biopolymer formation in unconsolidated porous media},
author = {Noh, Dong-Hwa and Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B. and Kwon, Tae-Hyuk and Muhunthan, Balasingam},
abstractNote = {This study investigated the P and S wave responses and permeability reduction during bacterial biopolymer formation in unconsolidated porous media. Column experiments with fine sands, where the model bacteria Leuconostoc mesenteroides were stimulated to produce insoluble biopolymer, were conducted while monitoring changes in permeability and P and S wave responses. The bacterial biopolymer reduced the permeability by more than 1 order of magnitude, occupying ~10% pore volume after 38 days of growth. This substantial reduction was attributed to the bacterial biopolymer with complex internal structures accumulated at pore throats. S wave velocity (VS) increased by more than ~50% during biopolymer accumulation; this indicated that the bacterial biopolymer caused a certain level of stiffening effect on shear modulus of the unconsolidated sediment matrix at low confining stress conditions. Whereas replacing pore water by insoluble biopolymer was observed to cause minimal changes in P wave velocity (VP) due to the low elastic moduli of insoluble biopolymer. The spectral ratio analyses revealed that the biopolymer formation caused a ~50-80% increase in P wave attenuation (1/QP) at the both ultrasonic and subultrasonic frequency ranges, at hundreds of kHz and tens of kHz, respectively, and a ~50-60% increase in S wave attenuation (1/QS) in the frequency band of several kHz. Our results reveal that in situ biopolymer formation and the resulting permeability reduction can be effectively monitored by using P and S wave attenuation in the ultrasonic and subultrasonic frequency ranges. Finally, this suggests that field monitoring using seismic logging techniques, including time-lapse dipole sonic logging, may be possible.},
doi = {10.1002/2015JG003118},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research. Biogeosciences},
number = 4,
volume = 121,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {3}
}