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Title: Multiscale characterization of irradiation behaviour of ion-irradiated SiC/SiC composites

Abstract

Here, the irradiation tolerance of SiC/SiC composites was studied using 10 MeV Au ion irradiations at 350 °C, for surface doses between 1 and 50 displacements per atom (dpa). Atomic force microscopy and optical profilometry revealed irradiation-induced axial and radial shrinkage of SiC-fibers. At 50 dpa, net fiber shrinkage reached 2.8 ± 0.3%. We conclude that the primary cause of SiC-fiber shrinkage in SiC/SiC composites is the irradiation-induced loss of pre-existing carbon packets, which had occupied 2–3% fiber volume in unirradiated state. A compelling evidence of the carbon packet loss was revealed using a combination of state-of-art conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution TEM, energy-filtered TEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Additionally, the carbon packet volume fraction decreased with increasing dose, reaching near-complete loss after 50 dpa. Carbon packet loss was further confirmed using Raman spectroscopy where the carbon D and G peaks disappeared after irradiation. In contrast, irradiation-induced swelling of 1 ± 0.5% was observed in the matrix after 50 dpa. The study also shows that up to 50 dpa, the multilayer pyrolytic-carbon (PyC) interface in the composite is highly irradiation tolerant as it maintained its morphology, graphitic nature and showed no signs of amorphization. Additionally, Raman spectroscopymore » revealed a saturation of TEM invisible disorder at 1 dpa for both ultra-fine grains of the fiber and the larger SiC-matrix grains. However, TEM visible extended defect formation such as dislocation loops were only detected in the larger matrix grains, thereby revealing a potential role of grain size on defect accumulation in SiC.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3]
  1. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Department of Materials Science and Engineering
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division
  3. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Department of Materials Science and Engineering; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1474616
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725; NE0008577
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Acta Materialia
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 161; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 1359-6454
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Silicon carbide (SiC); Implantation/irradiation; Transmission electron microscopy (TEM); Carbon; Raman spectroscopy

Citation Formats

Agarwal, Shradha, Duscher, Gerd J M, Zhao, Yajie, Crespillo, Miguel L., Katoh, Yutai, and Weber, William J. Multiscale characterization of irradiation behaviour of ion-irradiated SiC/SiC composites. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.actamat.2018.09.012.
Agarwal, Shradha, Duscher, Gerd J M, Zhao, Yajie, Crespillo, Miguel L., Katoh, Yutai, & Weber, William J. Multiscale characterization of irradiation behaviour of ion-irradiated SiC/SiC composites. United States. doi:10.1016/j.actamat.2018.09.012.
Agarwal, Shradha, Duscher, Gerd J M, Zhao, Yajie, Crespillo, Miguel L., Katoh, Yutai, and Weber, William J. Tue . "Multiscale characterization of irradiation behaviour of ion-irradiated SiC/SiC composites". United States. doi:10.1016/j.actamat.2018.09.012. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1474616.
@article{osti_1474616,
title = {Multiscale characterization of irradiation behaviour of ion-irradiated SiC/SiC composites},
author = {Agarwal, Shradha and Duscher, Gerd J M and Zhao, Yajie and Crespillo, Miguel L. and Katoh, Yutai and Weber, William J.},
abstractNote = {Here, the irradiation tolerance of SiC/SiC composites was studied using 10 MeV Au ion irradiations at 350 °C, for surface doses between 1 and 50 displacements per atom (dpa). Atomic force microscopy and optical profilometry revealed irradiation-induced axial and radial shrinkage of SiC-fibers. At 50 dpa, net fiber shrinkage reached 2.8 ± 0.3%. We conclude that the primary cause of SiC-fiber shrinkage in SiC/SiC composites is the irradiation-induced loss of pre-existing carbon packets, which had occupied 2–3% fiber volume in unirradiated state. A compelling evidence of the carbon packet loss was revealed using a combination of state-of-art conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution TEM, energy-filtered TEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Additionally, the carbon packet volume fraction decreased with increasing dose, reaching near-complete loss after 50 dpa. Carbon packet loss was further confirmed using Raman spectroscopy where the carbon D and G peaks disappeared after irradiation. In contrast, irradiation-induced swelling of 1 ± 0.5% was observed in the matrix after 50 dpa. The study also shows that up to 50 dpa, the multilayer pyrolytic-carbon (PyC) interface in the composite is highly irradiation tolerant as it maintained its morphology, graphitic nature and showed no signs of amorphization. Additionally, Raman spectroscopy revealed a saturation of TEM invisible disorder at 1 dpa for both ultra-fine grains of the fiber and the larger SiC-matrix grains. However, TEM visible extended defect formation such as dislocation loops were only detected in the larger matrix grains, thereby revealing a potential role of grain size on defect accumulation in SiC.},
doi = {10.1016/j.actamat.2018.09.012},
journal = {Acta Materialia},
number = C,
volume = 161,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}

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