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Title: Subsurface injection of combustion power plant effluent as a solid-phase carbon dioxide storage strategy

Long-term geological storage of CO 2 may be essential for greenhouse gas mitigation, so a number of storage strategies have been developed that utilize a variety of physical processes. Recent work shows that injection of combustion power plant effluent, a mixture of CO 2 and N 2, into CH 4 hydrate-bearing reservoirs blends CO 2 storage with simultaneous CH 4 production where the CO 2 is stored in hydrate, an immobile, solid compound. This strategy creates economic value from the CH 4 production, reduces the preinjection complexity since costly CO 2 distillation is circumvented, and limits leakage since hydrate is immobile. In this work, we explore the phase behavior of these types of injections and describe the individual roles of H 2O, CO 2, CH 4, and N 2 as these components partition into aqueous, vapor, hydrate, and liquid CO 2 phases. Our results show that CO 2 storage in subpermafrost or submarine hydrate-forming reservoirs requires coinjection of N 2 to maintain two-phase flow and limit plugging.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [1] ; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences, Inst. for Geophysics and Jackson School of Geosciences
  2. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
FE0010406
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Geophysical Research Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 44; Journal Issue: 11; Journal ID: ISSN 0094-8276
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Research Org:
Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; carbon storage; hydrate; methane production
OSTI Identifier:
1473893
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1375277

Darnell, K. N., Flemings, P. B., and DiCarlo, D.. Subsurface injection of combustion power plant effluent as a solid-phase carbon dioxide storage strategy. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1002/2017GL073663.
Darnell, K. N., Flemings, P. B., & DiCarlo, D.. Subsurface injection of combustion power plant effluent as a solid-phase carbon dioxide storage strategy. United States. doi:10.1002/2017GL073663.
Darnell, K. N., Flemings, P. B., and DiCarlo, D.. 2017. "Subsurface injection of combustion power plant effluent as a solid-phase carbon dioxide storage strategy". United States. doi:10.1002/2017GL073663. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1473893.
@article{osti_1473893,
title = {Subsurface injection of combustion power plant effluent as a solid-phase carbon dioxide storage strategy},
author = {Darnell, K. N. and Flemings, P. B. and DiCarlo, D.},
abstractNote = {Long-term geological storage of CO2 may be essential for greenhouse gas mitigation, so a number of storage strategies have been developed that utilize a variety of physical processes. Recent work shows that injection of combustion power plant effluent, a mixture of CO2 and N2, into CH4 hydrate-bearing reservoirs blends CO2 storage with simultaneous CH4 production where the CO2 is stored in hydrate, an immobile, solid compound. This strategy creates economic value from the CH4 production, reduces the preinjection complexity since costly CO2 distillation is circumvented, and limits leakage since hydrate is immobile. In this work, we explore the phase behavior of these types of injections and describe the individual roles of H2O, CO2, CH4, and N2 as these components partition into aqueous, vapor, hydrate, and liquid CO2 phases. Our results show that CO2 storage in subpermafrost or submarine hydrate-forming reservoirs requires coinjection of N2 to maintain two-phase flow and limit plugging.},
doi = {10.1002/2017GL073663},
journal = {Geophysical Research Letters},
number = 11,
volume = 44,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {5}
}