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Title: Techno-Economic Assessment of a Chopped Feedstock Logistics Supply Chain for Corn Stover

Abstract

Storing corn stover in wet, anaerobic conditions is an active management approach to reduce the risk of significant aerobic degradation and catastrophic loss due to fire. An estimated 50% of the corn stover available in the U.S. is too wet at the time of harvest to be stored safely in baled formats and is compatible with wet, anaerobic storage through ensiling. A fully wet, bulk logistics system based on field-chopping and particle size reduction early in the supply chain removes the dependency on field-drying of corn stover prior to baling, allowing for an expanded harvest window and resulting in diminished size reduction requirements at the biorefinery. The unit operations were defined for this wet, bulk logistics system, which included on-site preprocessing to meet biorefinery size and ash specifications, industrial-scale storage through ensiling, and delivery of wet corn stover at a rate of 2,000 tonnes per day to a biorefinery for approximately 50% of the year. The wet system was compared to the conventional bale system for 30% moisture (wet basis) corn stover, a likely delivered moisture content for baled corn stover harvested wet. Techno-economic analysis showed that the wet, bulk logistics system is cost competitive, costing only 10% more thanmore » the baled logistics system, meanwhile reducing the energy consumption by 48% and greenhouse gas release by 60%. In conclusion, a wet logistics system centered around on-site preprocessing and storage at a biorefinery gate is an economically viable approach to provide a stable source of corn stover for use when dry bales are not available, meanwhile reducing the risk of loss in long-term storage.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
  2. Harris Group, Seattle, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
OSTI Identifier:
1471249
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1471493
Report Number(s):
INL/JOU-18-44913-Rev000
Journal ID: ISSN 2296-598X
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Energy Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 90; Journal ID: ISSN 2296-598X
Publisher:
Frontiers Research Foundation
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; Corn stover; wet logistics; ensiling; techno-economic analysis; sustainability; forage chopping

Citation Formats

Wendt, Lynn M., Smith, William A., Hartley, Damon S., Wendt, Daniel S., Ross, Jeffrey A., Sexton, Danielle, Lukas, John, Nguyen, Quang A., Murphy, J. Austin, and Kenney, Kevin L. Techno-Economic Assessment of a Chopped Feedstock Logistics Supply Chain for Corn Stover. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.3389/fenrg.2018.00090.
Wendt, Lynn M., Smith, William A., Hartley, Damon S., Wendt, Daniel S., Ross, Jeffrey A., Sexton, Danielle, Lukas, John, Nguyen, Quang A., Murphy, J. Austin, & Kenney, Kevin L. Techno-Economic Assessment of a Chopped Feedstock Logistics Supply Chain for Corn Stover. United States. doi:10.3389/fenrg.2018.00090.
Wendt, Lynn M., Smith, William A., Hartley, Damon S., Wendt, Daniel S., Ross, Jeffrey A., Sexton, Danielle, Lukas, John, Nguyen, Quang A., Murphy, J. Austin, and Kenney, Kevin L. Tue . "Techno-Economic Assessment of a Chopped Feedstock Logistics Supply Chain for Corn Stover". United States. doi:10.3389/fenrg.2018.00090.
@article{osti_1471249,
title = {Techno-Economic Assessment of a Chopped Feedstock Logistics Supply Chain for Corn Stover},
author = {Wendt, Lynn M. and Smith, William A. and Hartley, Damon S. and Wendt, Daniel S. and Ross, Jeffrey A. and Sexton, Danielle and Lukas, John and Nguyen, Quang A. and Murphy, J. Austin and Kenney, Kevin L.},
abstractNote = {Storing corn stover in wet, anaerobic conditions is an active management approach to reduce the risk of significant aerobic degradation and catastrophic loss due to fire. An estimated 50% of the corn stover available in the U.S. is too wet at the time of harvest to be stored safely in baled formats and is compatible with wet, anaerobic storage through ensiling. A fully wet, bulk logistics system based on field-chopping and particle size reduction early in the supply chain removes the dependency on field-drying of corn stover prior to baling, allowing for an expanded harvest window and resulting in diminished size reduction requirements at the biorefinery. The unit operations were defined for this wet, bulk logistics system, which included on-site preprocessing to meet biorefinery size and ash specifications, industrial-scale storage through ensiling, and delivery of wet corn stover at a rate of 2,000 tonnes per day to a biorefinery for approximately 50% of the year. The wet system was compared to the conventional bale system for 30% moisture (wet basis) corn stover, a likely delivered moisture content for baled corn stover harvested wet. Techno-economic analysis showed that the wet, bulk logistics system is cost competitive, costing only 10% more than the baled logistics system, meanwhile reducing the energy consumption by 48% and greenhouse gas release by 60%. In conclusion, a wet logistics system centered around on-site preprocessing and storage at a biorefinery gate is an economically viable approach to provide a stable source of corn stover for use when dry bales are not available, meanwhile reducing the risk of loss in long-term storage.},
doi = {10.3389/fenrg.2018.00090},
journal = {Frontiers in Energy Research},
number = 90,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.3389/fenrg.2018.00090

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