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Title: A simple developmental model recapitulates complex insect wing venation patterns

Abstract

Insect wings are typically supported by thickened struts called veins. These veins form diverse geometric patterns across insects. For many insect species, even the left and right wings from the same individual have veins with unique topological arrangements, and little is known about how these patterns form. We present a large-scale quantitative study of the fingerprint-like “secondary veins.” We compile a dataset of wings from 232 species and 17 families from the order Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies), a group with particularly elaborate vein patterns. We characterize the geometric arrangements of veins and develop a simple model of secondary vein patterning. We show that our model is capable of recapitulating the vein geometries of species from other, distantly related winged insect clades.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1]; ORCiD logo [4]
  1. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)
  2. Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)
  3. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)
  4. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1471162
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1526542
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 115; Journal Issue: 40; Journal ID: ISSN 0027-8424
Publisher:
National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; insect wings; patterning; image segmentation; computational modeling; Odonata

Citation Formats

Hoffmann, Jordan, Donoughe, Seth, Li, Kathy, Salcedo, Mary K., and Rycroft, Chris H. A simple developmental model recapitulates complex insect wing venation patterns. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.1721248115.
Hoffmann, Jordan, Donoughe, Seth, Li, Kathy, Salcedo, Mary K., & Rycroft, Chris H. A simple developmental model recapitulates complex insect wing venation patterns. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1721248115.
Hoffmann, Jordan, Donoughe, Seth, Li, Kathy, Salcedo, Mary K., and Rycroft, Chris H. Mon . "A simple developmental model recapitulates complex insect wing venation patterns". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1721248115.
@article{osti_1471162,
title = {A simple developmental model recapitulates complex insect wing venation patterns},
author = {Hoffmann, Jordan and Donoughe, Seth and Li, Kathy and Salcedo, Mary K. and Rycroft, Chris H.},
abstractNote = {Insect wings are typically supported by thickened struts called veins. These veins form diverse geometric patterns across insects. For many insect species, even the left and right wings from the same individual have veins with unique topological arrangements, and little is known about how these patterns form. We present a large-scale quantitative study of the fingerprint-like “secondary veins.” We compile a dataset of wings from 232 species and 17 families from the order Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies), a group with particularly elaborate vein patterns. We characterize the geometric arrangements of veins and develop a simple model of secondary vein patterning. We show that our model is capable of recapitulating the vein geometries of species from other, distantly related winged insect clades.},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.1721248115},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
number = 40,
volume = 115,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1721248115

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