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Title: Current-driven nanowire formation on surfaces of crystalline conducting substrates

The formation and precise manipulation of nanoscale features by controlling macroscopic forces is essential to advancing nanotechnology. Toward this end, we report here a theoretical study on formation of nanowires with precisely controlled widths, starting from single-layer conducting islands on crystalline conducting substrates under the controlled action of macroscopic forcing provided by an externally applied electric field that drives island edge electromigration. Numerical simulations based on an experimentally validated model and supported by linear stability theory show that large-size islands undergo a current-induced fingering instability, leading to nanowire formation after finger growth. Depending on the substrate surface crystallographic orientation, necking instabilities after fingering lead to the formation of multiple parallel nanowires per island. In all cases, the axis of the formed nanowires is aligned with the direction of the externally applied electric field. The nanowires have constant widths, on the order of 10 nm, which can be tuned by controlling the externally applied electric field strength. In conclusion, our findings have important implications for developing future lithography-free nanofabrication and nanoelectronic patterning techniques.
Authors:
 [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-07ER46407
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 108; Journal Issue: 19; Journal ID: ISSN 0003-6951
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Research Org:
Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22). Materials Sciences & Engineering Division; USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE
OSTI Identifier:
1471102
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1252582

Kumar, Ashish, Dasgupta, Dwaipayan, Dimitrakopoulos, Christos, and Maroudas, Dimitrios. Current-driven nanowire formation on surfaces of crystalline conducting substrates. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1063/1.4949333.
Kumar, Ashish, Dasgupta, Dwaipayan, Dimitrakopoulos, Christos, & Maroudas, Dimitrios. Current-driven nanowire formation on surfaces of crystalline conducting substrates. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4949333.
Kumar, Ashish, Dasgupta, Dwaipayan, Dimitrakopoulos, Christos, and Maroudas, Dimitrios. 2016. "Current-driven nanowire formation on surfaces of crystalline conducting substrates". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4949333. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1471102.
@article{osti_1471102,
title = {Current-driven nanowire formation on surfaces of crystalline conducting substrates},
author = {Kumar, Ashish and Dasgupta, Dwaipayan and Dimitrakopoulos, Christos and Maroudas, Dimitrios},
abstractNote = {The formation and precise manipulation of nanoscale features by controlling macroscopic forces is essential to advancing nanotechnology. Toward this end, we report here a theoretical study on formation of nanowires with precisely controlled widths, starting from single-layer conducting islands on crystalline conducting substrates under the controlled action of macroscopic forcing provided by an externally applied electric field that drives island edge electromigration. Numerical simulations based on an experimentally validated model and supported by linear stability theory show that large-size islands undergo a current-induced fingering instability, leading to nanowire formation after finger growth. Depending on the substrate surface crystallographic orientation, necking instabilities after fingering lead to the formation of multiple parallel nanowires per island. In all cases, the axis of the formed nanowires is aligned with the direction of the externally applied electric field. The nanowires have constant widths, on the order of 10 nm, which can be tuned by controlling the externally applied electric field strength. In conclusion, our findings have important implications for developing future lithography-free nanofabrication and nanoelectronic patterning techniques.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4949333},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 19,
volume = 108,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {5}
}