skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Thermodynamic Driving Force in the Spontaneous Formation of Inorganic Nanoparticle Solutions

Abstract

Nanoparticles are the bridge between the molecular and the macroscopic worlds. The growing number of commercial applications for nanoparticles spans from consumer products to new frontiers of medicine and next-generation optoelectronic technology. They are most commonly deployed in the form of a colloid, or “ink”, which are formulated with solvents, surfactants, and electrolytes to kinetically prevent the solid particulate phase from reaching the thermodynamically favored state of separate solid and liquid phases. In this work, we theoretically determine the thermodynamic requirements for forming a single-phase solution of spherical particles and engineer a model system to experimentally demonstrate the spontaneous formation of solutions composed of only solvent and bare inorganic nanoparticles. We show molecular interactions at the nanoparticle interface are the driving force in high-concentration nanoparticle solutions. The work establishes a regime where inorganic nanoparticles behave as molecular solutes as opposed to kinetically stable colloids, which has far-reaching implications for the future design and deployment of nanomaterial technologies.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics (CASP)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1470564
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nano Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 3; Related Information: CASP partners with Los Alamos National Laboratory (lead); University of California, Irvine; University of Colorado; Colorado School of Mines; George Mason University; Los Alamos National Laboratory; University of Minnesota; National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Journal ID: ISSN 1530-6984
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 42 ENGINEERING; solar (photovoltaic); solar (fuels); solid state lighting; bio-inspired; electrodes - solar; defects; charge transport; materials and chemistry by design; optics; synthesis (novel materials); synthesis (scalable processing)

Citation Formats

Wheeler, Lance M., Kramer, Nicolaas J., and Kortshagen, Uwe R. Thermodynamic Driving Force in the Spontaneous Formation of Inorganic Nanoparticle Solutions. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b05187.
Wheeler, Lance M., Kramer, Nicolaas J., & Kortshagen, Uwe R. Thermodynamic Driving Force in the Spontaneous Formation of Inorganic Nanoparticle Solutions. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b05187.
Wheeler, Lance M., Kramer, Nicolaas J., and Kortshagen, Uwe R. Mon . "Thermodynamic Driving Force in the Spontaneous Formation of Inorganic Nanoparticle Solutions". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b05187. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1470564.
@article{osti_1470564,
title = {Thermodynamic Driving Force in the Spontaneous Formation of Inorganic Nanoparticle Solutions},
author = {Wheeler, Lance M. and Kramer, Nicolaas J. and Kortshagen, Uwe R.},
abstractNote = {Nanoparticles are the bridge between the molecular and the macroscopic worlds. The growing number of commercial applications for nanoparticles spans from consumer products to new frontiers of medicine and next-generation optoelectronic technology. They are most commonly deployed in the form of a colloid, or “ink”, which are formulated with solvents, surfactants, and electrolytes to kinetically prevent the solid particulate phase from reaching the thermodynamically favored state of separate solid and liquid phases. In this work, we theoretically determine the thermodynamic requirements for forming a single-phase solution of spherical particles and engineer a model system to experimentally demonstrate the spontaneous formation of solutions composed of only solvent and bare inorganic nanoparticles. We show molecular interactions at the nanoparticle interface are the driving force in high-concentration nanoparticle solutions. The work establishes a regime where inorganic nanoparticles behave as molecular solutes as opposed to kinetically stable colloids, which has far-reaching implications for the future design and deployment of nanomaterial technologies.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b05187},
journal = {Nano Letters},
number = 3,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {2}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 11 works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share: