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Title: Surface nanopattern formation due to current-induced homoepitaxial nanowire edge instability

Physical nanopatterning based on a precise control of macroscopic forcing is an essential tool of nanoscale science and technology. Using an externally applied electric field as the macroscopic force, we report here a computational study on the formation of surface nanopatterns consisting of single-layer homoepitaxial islands as a result of a morphological instability that can occur under edge electromigration conditions on the straight edge of a single-layer nanowire grown epitaxially on a crystalline substrate. Direct dynamical simulations based on a model that has been validated experimentally for the Ag/Ag system show that the current-induced nanowire edge instability causes the breakup of the nanowire and leads to the formation of uniformly distributed islands, arranged in linear or V-shaped arrays, which are uniformly sized with nanoscale dimensions. The simulation results are supported by linear stability theory and demonstrate that the geometrical features of the island patterns and the island sizes can be controlled precisely by controlling the electric field direction with respect to the nanowire axis and the electric field strength. Our findings have important implications for developing physical nanopatterning approaches toward enabling future nanofabrication technologies.
Authors:
 [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-07ER46407
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 109; Journal Issue: 11; Journal ID: ISSN 0003-6951
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Research Org:
Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22). Materials Sciences & Engineering Division; USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE
OSTI Identifier:
1468928
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1328492

Kumar, Ashish, Dasgupta, Dwaipayan, and Maroudas, Dimitrios. Surface nanopattern formation due to current-induced homoepitaxial nanowire edge instability. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1063/1.4962730.
Kumar, Ashish, Dasgupta, Dwaipayan, & Maroudas, Dimitrios. Surface nanopattern formation due to current-induced homoepitaxial nanowire edge instability. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4962730.
Kumar, Ashish, Dasgupta, Dwaipayan, and Maroudas, Dimitrios. 2016. "Surface nanopattern formation due to current-induced homoepitaxial nanowire edge instability". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4962730. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1468928.
@article{osti_1468928,
title = {Surface nanopattern formation due to current-induced homoepitaxial nanowire edge instability},
author = {Kumar, Ashish and Dasgupta, Dwaipayan and Maroudas, Dimitrios},
abstractNote = {Physical nanopatterning based on a precise control of macroscopic forcing is an essential tool of nanoscale science and technology. Using an externally applied electric field as the macroscopic force, we report here a computational study on the formation of surface nanopatterns consisting of single-layer homoepitaxial islands as a result of a morphological instability that can occur under edge electromigration conditions on the straight edge of a single-layer nanowire grown epitaxially on a crystalline substrate. Direct dynamical simulations based on a model that has been validated experimentally for the Ag/Ag system show that the current-induced nanowire edge instability causes the breakup of the nanowire and leads to the formation of uniformly distributed islands, arranged in linear or V-shaped arrays, which are uniformly sized with nanoscale dimensions. The simulation results are supported by linear stability theory and demonstrate that the geometrical features of the island patterns and the island sizes can be controlled precisely by controlling the electric field direction with respect to the nanowire axis and the electric field strength. Our findings have important implications for developing physical nanopatterning approaches toward enabling future nanofabrication technologies.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4962730},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 11,
volume = 109,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {9}
}

Works referenced in this record:

Directed Assembly of One-Dimensional Nanostructures into Functional Networks
journal, January 2001