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Title: Protein hyperproduction in fungi by design

The secretion of enzymes used by fungi to digest their environment has been exploited by humans for centuries for food and beverage production. More than a century after the first biotechnology patent, we know that the enzyme cocktails secreted by these amazing organisms have tremendous use across a number of industrial processes. Secreting the maximum titer of enzymes is critical to the economic feasibility of these processes. So far, traditional mutagenesis and screening approaches have generated the vast majority of strains used by industry for the production of enzymes. Until the emergence of economical next generation DNA sequencing platforms, the majority of the genes mutated in these screens remained uncharacterized at the sequence level. In addition, mutagenesis comes with a cost to an organism’s fitness, making tractable rational strain design approaches an attractive alternative. As an alternative to traditional mutagenesis and screening, controlled manipulation of multiple genes involved in processes that impact the ability of a fungus to sense its environment, regulate transcription of enzyme-encoding genes, and efficiently secrete these proteins will allow for rational design of improved fungal protein production strains.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Biosystems Design and Simulation Group, Environmental Molecular Sciences Division and Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-137094
Journal ID: ISSN 0175-7598; PII: 9265
Grant/Contract Number:
AC0576RL01830; AC02-05CH11231
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 102; Journal Issue: 20; Journal ID: ISSN 0175-7598
Publisher:
Springer
Research Org:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; Enzyme; Protein; Hyperproduction; Secretion; Biodesign; Fungi; Biotechnology
OSTI Identifier:
1468613

Baker, Scott E. Protein hyperproduction in fungi by design. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1007/S00253-018-9265-1.
Baker, Scott E. Protein hyperproduction in fungi by design. United States. doi:10.1007/S00253-018-9265-1.
Baker, Scott E. 2018. "Protein hyperproduction in fungi by design". United States. doi:10.1007/S00253-018-9265-1. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1468613.
@article{osti_1468613,
title = {Protein hyperproduction in fungi by design},
author = {Baker, Scott E.},
abstractNote = {The secretion of enzymes used by fungi to digest their environment has been exploited by humans for centuries for food and beverage production. More than a century after the first biotechnology patent, we know that the enzyme cocktails secreted by these amazing organisms have tremendous use across a number of industrial processes. Secreting the maximum titer of enzymes is critical to the economic feasibility of these processes. So far, traditional mutagenesis and screening approaches have generated the vast majority of strains used by industry for the production of enzymes. Until the emergence of economical next generation DNA sequencing platforms, the majority of the genes mutated in these screens remained uncharacterized at the sequence level. In addition, mutagenesis comes with a cost to an organism’s fitness, making tractable rational strain design approaches an attractive alternative. As an alternative to traditional mutagenesis and screening, controlled manipulation of multiple genes involved in processes that impact the ability of a fungus to sense its environment, regulate transcription of enzyme-encoding genes, and efficiently secrete these proteins will allow for rational design of improved fungal protein production strains.},
doi = {10.1007/S00253-018-9265-1},
journal = {Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology},
number = 20,
volume = 102,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {8}
}

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Trichoderma reesei RUT-C30 - thirty years of strain improvement
journal, October 2011