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Title: Review of Soil Organic Carbon Measurement Protocols: A US and Brazil Comparison and Recommendation

Soil organic carbon (SOC) change influences the life-cycle assessment (LCA) calculations for globally traded bio-based products. Broad agreement on the importance of SOC measurement stands in contrast with inconsistent measurement methods. This paper focuses on published SOC research on lands managed for maize ( Zea mays L.) in the U.S. and sugarcane ( Saccharum officinarum L.) in Brazil. A literature review found that reported SOC measurement protocols reflect different sampling strategies, measurement techniques, and laboratory analysis methods. Variability in sampling techniques (pits versus core samples), depths, increments for analysis, and analytical procedures (wet oxidation versus dry combustion) can influence reported SOC values. To improve consistency and comparability in future SOC studies, the authors recommend that: (a) the methods applied for each step in SOC studies be documented; (b) a defined protocol for soil pits or coring be applied; (c) samples be analyzed at 10 cm intervals for the full rooting depth and at 20 cm intervals below rooting until reaching 100 cm; (d) stratified sampling schemes be applied where possible to reflect variability across study sites; (e) standard laboratory techniques be used to differentiate among labile and stable SOC fractions; and (f) more long-term, diachronic approaches be used to assessmore » SOC change. Here, we conclude with suggestions for future research to further improve the comparability of SOC measurements across sites and nations.« less
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ; ORCiD logo [1] ;  [4] ;  [5]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  2. The Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (EMBRAPA Agrobiologia), Seropedica (Brazil)
  3. National Laboratory for Agriculture and the Environment (NLAE), Ames, IA (United States)
  4. Interdisciplinary Center of Energy Planning (NIPE)/Unicamp, Campinas (Brazil)
  5. Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Sustainability (Basel)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Sustainability (Basel); Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 2071-1050
Publisher:
MDPI
Research Org:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; carbon sequestration; soil sampling; bioenergy; ethanol; sugarcane; maize
OSTI Identifier:
1468289

Davis, Maggie R., Alves, Bruno J. R., Karlen, Douglas L., Kline, Keith L., Galdos, Marcelo, and Abulebdeh, Dana T.. Review of Soil Organic Carbon Measurement Protocols: A US and Brazil Comparison and Recommendation. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.3390/su10010053.
Davis, Maggie R., Alves, Bruno J. R., Karlen, Douglas L., Kline, Keith L., Galdos, Marcelo, & Abulebdeh, Dana T.. Review of Soil Organic Carbon Measurement Protocols: A US and Brazil Comparison and Recommendation. United States. doi:10.3390/su10010053.
Davis, Maggie R., Alves, Bruno J. R., Karlen, Douglas L., Kline, Keith L., Galdos, Marcelo, and Abulebdeh, Dana T.. 2017. "Review of Soil Organic Carbon Measurement Protocols: A US and Brazil Comparison and Recommendation". United States. doi:10.3390/su10010053. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1468289.
@article{osti_1468289,
title = {Review of Soil Organic Carbon Measurement Protocols: A US and Brazil Comparison and Recommendation},
author = {Davis, Maggie R. and Alves, Bruno J. R. and Karlen, Douglas L. and Kline, Keith L. and Galdos, Marcelo and Abulebdeh, Dana T.},
abstractNote = {Soil organic carbon (SOC) change influences the life-cycle assessment (LCA) calculations for globally traded bio-based products. Broad agreement on the importance of SOC measurement stands in contrast with inconsistent measurement methods. This paper focuses on published SOC research on lands managed for maize (Zea mays L.) in the U.S. and sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) in Brazil. A literature review found that reported SOC measurement protocols reflect different sampling strategies, measurement techniques, and laboratory analysis methods. Variability in sampling techniques (pits versus core samples), depths, increments for analysis, and analytical procedures (wet oxidation versus dry combustion) can influence reported SOC values. To improve consistency and comparability in future SOC studies, the authors recommend that: (a) the methods applied for each step in SOC studies be documented; (b) a defined protocol for soil pits or coring be applied; (c) samples be analyzed at 10 cm intervals for the full rooting depth and at 20 cm intervals below rooting until reaching 100 cm; (d) stratified sampling schemes be applied where possible to reflect variability across study sites; (e) standard laboratory techniques be used to differentiate among labile and stable SOC fractions; and (f) more long-term, diachronic approaches be used to assess SOC change. Here, we conclude with suggestions for future research to further improve the comparability of SOC measurements across sites and nations.},
doi = {10.3390/su10010053},
journal = {Sustainability (Basel)},
number = 2,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}