skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Bacterial–fungal interactions: ecology, mechanisms and challenges

Abstract

Fungi and bacteria are found living together in a wide variety of environments. Their interactions are significant drivers of many ecosystem functions and are important for the health of plants and animals. A large number of fungal and bacterial families engage in complex interactions that lead to critical behavioural shifts of the microorganisms ranging from mutualism to antagonism. The importance of bacterial–fungal interactions (BFI) in environmental science, medicine and biotechnology has led to the emergence of a dynamic and multidisciplinary research field that combines highly diverse approaches including molecular biology, genomics, geochemistry, chemical and microbial ecology, biophysics and ecological modelling. In this review, we discuss recent advances that underscore the roles of BFI across relevant habitats and ecosystems. A particular focus is placed on the understanding of BFI within complex microbial communities and in regard of the metaorganism concept. We also discuss recent discoveries that clarify the (molecular) mechanisms involved in bacterial–fungal relationships, and the contribution of new technologies to decipher generic principles of BFI in terms of physical associations and molecular dialogues. Lastly, we discuss future directions for research in order to stimulate synergy within the BFI research area and to resolve outstanding questions.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7]; ORCiD logo [8]; ORCiD logo [9];  [10];  [1]; ORCiD logo [11];  [12];  [6];  [13];  [14];  [15];  [16];  [17]
  1. Univ. de Lorraine, Champenoux (France)
  2. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)
  3. Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  4. Institut de Biologie et Genetique Cellulaire, Bordeaux cedex (France)
  5. Leibniz-Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops, GroBbeeren (Germany)
  6. Univ. of Neuchatel, Neuchatel (Switzerland)
  7. Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Cologne (Germany)
  8. Univ. of Neuchatel, Neuchatel (Switzerland); Univ. of Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland)
  9. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
  10. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)
  11. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  12. Eotvos Lorand Univ., Budapest (Hungary)
  13. Univ. of Torino, Torino (Italy)
  14. Academic Centre for Dentistry, Amsterdam (The Netherlands)
  15. Fujian Agriculture and Forestry Univ. (FAFU), Fuzhou (China)
  16. Univ. of Groningen, Groningen (The Netherlands)
  17. Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research—UFZ, Leipzig (Germany)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1468277
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1471883
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
FEMS Microbiology Reviews
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1574-6976
Publisher:
Federation of European Microbiological Societies
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; bacterial–fungal interactions; metaorganisms; microbiome; mechanism; microbial logistics

Citation Formats

Deveau, Aurélie, Bonito, Gregory, Uehling, Jessie, Paoletti, Mathieu, Becker, Matthias, Bindschedler, Saskia, Hacquard, Stéphane, Hervé, Vincent, Labbé, Jessy, Lastovetsky, Olga A., Mieszkin, Sophie, Millet, Larry J., Vajna, Balázs, Junier, Pilar, Bonfante, Paola, Krom, Bastiaan P., Olsson, Stefan, van Elsas, Jan Dirk, and Wick, Lukas Y. Bacterial–fungal interactions: ecology, mechanisms and challenges. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1093/femsre/fuy008.
Deveau, Aurélie, Bonito, Gregory, Uehling, Jessie, Paoletti, Mathieu, Becker, Matthias, Bindschedler, Saskia, Hacquard, Stéphane, Hervé, Vincent, Labbé, Jessy, Lastovetsky, Olga A., Mieszkin, Sophie, Millet, Larry J., Vajna, Balázs, Junier, Pilar, Bonfante, Paola, Krom, Bastiaan P., Olsson, Stefan, van Elsas, Jan Dirk, & Wick, Lukas Y. Bacterial–fungal interactions: ecology, mechanisms and challenges. United States. doi:10.1093/femsre/fuy008.
Deveau, Aurélie, Bonito, Gregory, Uehling, Jessie, Paoletti, Mathieu, Becker, Matthias, Bindschedler, Saskia, Hacquard, Stéphane, Hervé, Vincent, Labbé, Jessy, Lastovetsky, Olga A., Mieszkin, Sophie, Millet, Larry J., Vajna, Balázs, Junier, Pilar, Bonfante, Paola, Krom, Bastiaan P., Olsson, Stefan, van Elsas, Jan Dirk, and Wick, Lukas Y. Mon . "Bacterial–fungal interactions: ecology, mechanisms and challenges". United States. doi:10.1093/femsre/fuy008. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1468277.
@article{osti_1468277,
title = {Bacterial–fungal interactions: ecology, mechanisms and challenges},
author = {Deveau, Aurélie and Bonito, Gregory and Uehling, Jessie and Paoletti, Mathieu and Becker, Matthias and Bindschedler, Saskia and Hacquard, Stéphane and Hervé, Vincent and Labbé, Jessy and Lastovetsky, Olga A. and Mieszkin, Sophie and Millet, Larry J. and Vajna, Balázs and Junier, Pilar and Bonfante, Paola and Krom, Bastiaan P. and Olsson, Stefan and van Elsas, Jan Dirk and Wick, Lukas Y.},
abstractNote = {Fungi and bacteria are found living together in a wide variety of environments. Their interactions are significant drivers of many ecosystem functions and are important for the health of plants and animals. A large number of fungal and bacterial families engage in complex interactions that lead to critical behavioural shifts of the microorganisms ranging from mutualism to antagonism. The importance of bacterial–fungal interactions (BFI) in environmental science, medicine and biotechnology has led to the emergence of a dynamic and multidisciplinary research field that combines highly diverse approaches including molecular biology, genomics, geochemistry, chemical and microbial ecology, biophysics and ecological modelling. In this review, we discuss recent advances that underscore the roles of BFI across relevant habitats and ecosystems. A particular focus is placed on the understanding of BFI within complex microbial communities and in regard of the metaorganism concept. We also discuss recent discoveries that clarify the (molecular) mechanisms involved in bacterial–fungal relationships, and the contribution of new technologies to decipher generic principles of BFI in terms of physical associations and molecular dialogues. Lastly, we discuss future directions for research in order to stimulate synergy within the BFI research area and to resolve outstanding questions.},
doi = {10.1093/femsre/fuy008},
journal = {FEMS Microbiology Reviews},
number = 3,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {2}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 17 works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share: