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Title: Leaf thermotolerance in dry tropical forest tree species: relationships with leaf traits and effects of drought

Understanding how tropical trees will respond to extreme temperatures and drought is essential to predict how future increases in the severity, frequency and duration of extreme climatic events will affect tropical systems. In this study, we investigated leaf thermotolerance by quantifying the temperatures that resulted in a 50 % decrease in photosystem II function (T 50) in experimentally grown saplings of 12 tree species from a seasonally dry tropical forest. We examined the relationship of thermotolerance with leaf functional traits and photosynthetic rates. Additionally, we tested how water limitation altered thermotolerance within species, and examined the relationship between thermotolerance and drought tolerance among species. Thermotolerance ranged from 44.5 to 48.1 °C in the least and most thermotolerant species, respectively. The observed variation in thermotolerance indicates that the upper limits of leaf function are critically close to maximum temperatures in this region, and that these species will be vulnerable to, and differentially affected by, future warming. Drought increased temperature tolerance, and species that were more drought tolerant were also more thermotolerant. Importantly, thermotolerance was positively related to the key leaf functional trait—leaf mass per area (LMA), and congruent with this, negatively related to photosynthetic rates. Furthermore, these results indicate that moremore » productive species with lower LMA and higher photosynthetic rates may be more vulnerable to heat and drought stress, and more likely to be negatively affected by future increases in extreme climatic events.« less
Authors:
 [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ;  [1]
  1. Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune (India)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
AoB Plants
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-2851
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; Annals of Botany Company
Research Org:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Climate change; drought; leaf functional traits; photosynthesis; PSII chlorophyll fluorescence; thermotolerance; tropical forests
OSTI Identifier:
1468254

Sastry, Aniruddh, Guha, Anirban, and Barua, Deepak. Leaf thermotolerance in dry tropical forest tree species: relationships with leaf traits and effects of drought. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1093/aobpla/plx070.
Sastry, Aniruddh, Guha, Anirban, & Barua, Deepak. Leaf thermotolerance in dry tropical forest tree species: relationships with leaf traits and effects of drought. United States. doi:10.1093/aobpla/plx070.
Sastry, Aniruddh, Guha, Anirban, and Barua, Deepak. 2017. "Leaf thermotolerance in dry tropical forest tree species: relationships with leaf traits and effects of drought". United States. doi:10.1093/aobpla/plx070. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1468254.
@article{osti_1468254,
title = {Leaf thermotolerance in dry tropical forest tree species: relationships with leaf traits and effects of drought},
author = {Sastry, Aniruddh and Guha, Anirban and Barua, Deepak},
abstractNote = {Understanding how tropical trees will respond to extreme temperatures and drought is essential to predict how future increases in the severity, frequency and duration of extreme climatic events will affect tropical systems. In this study, we investigated leaf thermotolerance by quantifying the temperatures that resulted in a 50 % decrease in photosystem II function (T50) in experimentally grown saplings of 12 tree species from a seasonally dry tropical forest. We examined the relationship of thermotolerance with leaf functional traits and photosynthetic rates. Additionally, we tested how water limitation altered thermotolerance within species, and examined the relationship between thermotolerance and drought tolerance among species. Thermotolerance ranged from 44.5 to 48.1 °C in the least and most thermotolerant species, respectively. The observed variation in thermotolerance indicates that the upper limits of leaf function are critically close to maximum temperatures in this region, and that these species will be vulnerable to, and differentially affected by, future warming. Drought increased temperature tolerance, and species that were more drought tolerant were also more thermotolerant. Importantly, thermotolerance was positively related to the key leaf functional trait—leaf mass per area (LMA), and congruent with this, negatively related to photosynthetic rates. Furthermore, these results indicate that more productive species with lower LMA and higher photosynthetic rates may be more vulnerable to heat and drought stress, and more likely to be negatively affected by future increases in extreme climatic events.},
doi = {10.1093/aobpla/plx070},
journal = {AoB Plants},
number = 1,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}