skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Leaf thermotolerance in dry tropical forest tree species: relationships with leaf traits and effects of drought

Abstract

Understanding how tropical trees will respond to extreme temperatures and drought is essential to predict how future increases in the severity, frequency and duration of extreme climatic events will affect tropical systems. In this study, we investigated leaf thermotolerance by quantifying the temperatures that resulted in a 50 % decrease in photosystem II function (T 50) in experimentally grown saplings of 12 tree species from a seasonally dry tropical forest. We examined the relationship of thermotolerance with leaf functional traits and photosynthetic rates. Additionally, we tested how water limitation altered thermotolerance within species, and examined the relationship between thermotolerance and drought tolerance among species. Thermotolerance ranged from 44.5 to 48.1 °C in the least and most thermotolerant species, respectively. The observed variation in thermotolerance indicates that the upper limits of leaf function are critically close to maximum temperatures in this region, and that these species will be vulnerable to, and differentially affected by, future warming. Drought increased temperature tolerance, and species that were more drought tolerant were also more thermotolerant. Importantly, thermotolerance was positively related to the key leaf functional trait—leaf mass per area (LMA), and congruent with this, negatively related to photosynthetic rates. Furthermore, these results indicate that moremore » productive species with lower LMA and higher photosynthetic rates may be more vulnerable to heat and drought stress, and more likely to be negatively affected by future increases in extreme climatic events.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]
  1. Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune (India)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1468254
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
AoB Plants
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-2851
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; Annals of Botany Company
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Climate change; drought; leaf functional traits; photosynthesis; PSII chlorophyll fluorescence; thermotolerance; tropical forests

Citation Formats

Sastry, Aniruddh, Guha, Anirban, and Barua, Deepak. Leaf thermotolerance in dry tropical forest tree species: relationships with leaf traits and effects of drought. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1093/aobpla/plx070.
Sastry, Aniruddh, Guha, Anirban, & Barua, Deepak. Leaf thermotolerance in dry tropical forest tree species: relationships with leaf traits and effects of drought. United States. doi:10.1093/aobpla/plx070.
Sastry, Aniruddh, Guha, Anirban, and Barua, Deepak. Mon . "Leaf thermotolerance in dry tropical forest tree species: relationships with leaf traits and effects of drought". United States. doi:10.1093/aobpla/plx070. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1468254.
@article{osti_1468254,
title = {Leaf thermotolerance in dry tropical forest tree species: relationships with leaf traits and effects of drought},
author = {Sastry, Aniruddh and Guha, Anirban and Barua, Deepak},
abstractNote = {Understanding how tropical trees will respond to extreme temperatures and drought is essential to predict how future increases in the severity, frequency and duration of extreme climatic events will affect tropical systems. In this study, we investigated leaf thermotolerance by quantifying the temperatures that resulted in a 50 % decrease in photosystem II function (T50) in experimentally grown saplings of 12 tree species from a seasonally dry tropical forest. We examined the relationship of thermotolerance with leaf functional traits and photosynthetic rates. Additionally, we tested how water limitation altered thermotolerance within species, and examined the relationship between thermotolerance and drought tolerance among species. Thermotolerance ranged from 44.5 to 48.1 °C in the least and most thermotolerant species, respectively. The observed variation in thermotolerance indicates that the upper limits of leaf function are critically close to maximum temperatures in this region, and that these species will be vulnerable to, and differentially affected by, future warming. Drought increased temperature tolerance, and species that were more drought tolerant were also more thermotolerant. Importantly, thermotolerance was positively related to the key leaf functional trait—leaf mass per area (LMA), and congruent with this, negatively related to photosynthetic rates. Furthermore, these results indicate that more productive species with lower LMA and higher photosynthetic rates may be more vulnerable to heat and drought stress, and more likely to be negatively affected by future increases in extreme climatic events.},
doi = {10.1093/aobpla/plx070},
journal = {AoB Plants},
number = 1,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2 works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share:

Works referenced in this record:

Die Hitzeresistenz der Pflanzen des kanarischen Lorbeerwaldes
journal, January 1980


Estimating heat tolerance among plant species by two chlorophyll fluorescence parameters
journal, September 2005


Tropical Forests in the Anthropocene
journal, October 2014


Growth response and acclimation of CO2 exchange characteristics to elevated temperatures in tropical tree seedlings
journal, July 2013

  • Cheesman, Alexander W.; Winter, Klaus
  • Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol. 64, Issue 12
  • DOI: 10.1093/jxb/ert211

Visual assessment of wilting as a measure of leaf water potential and seedling drought survival
journal, July 2007

  • Engelbrecht, Bettina M. J.; Tyree, Melvin T.; Kursar, Thomas A.
  • Journal of Tropical Ecology, Vol. 23, Issue 4
  • DOI: 10.1017/S026646740700421X

Thermal limits of leaf metabolism across biomes
journal, October 2016

  • O'sullivan, Odhran S.; Heskel, Mary A.; Reich, Peter B.
  • Global Change Biology, Vol. 23, Issue 1
  • DOI: 10.1111/gcb.13477

Drought increases heat tolerance of leaf respiration in Eucalyptus globulus saplings grown under both ambient and elevated atmospheric [CO2] and temperature
journal, September 2014

  • Gauthier, Paul P. G.; Crous, Kristine Y.; Ayub, Gohar
  • Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol. 65, Issue 22
  • DOI: 10.1093/jxb/eru367

Will seasonally dry tropical forests be sensitive or resistant to future changes in rainfall regimes?
journal, February 2017

  • Allen, Kara; Dupuy, Juan Manuel; Gei, Maria G.
  • Environmental Research Letters, Vol. 12, Issue 2
  • DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/aa5968

The world-wide ‘fast-slow’ plant economics spectrum: a traits manifesto
journal, February 2014


Determination of leaf heat resistance: comparative investigation of chlorophyll fluorescence changes and tissue necrosis methods
journal, January 1984

  • Bilger, H. -W.; Schreiber, U.; Lange, O. L.
  • Oecologia, Vol. 63, Issue 2
  • DOI: 10.1007/BF00379886

Leaves in the lowest and highest winds: temperature, force and shape
journal, July 2009


Patterns of tree phenological diversity in dry tropics
journal, August 2011


Subtropical to boreal convergence of tree-leaf temperatures
journal, June 2008

  • Helliker, Brent R.; Richter, Suzanna L.
  • Nature, Vol. 454, Issue 7203
  • DOI: 10.1038/nature07031

More Intense, More Frequent, and Longer Lasting Heat Waves in the 21st Century
journal, August 2004


Plant growth and mortality under climatic extremes: An overview
journal, February 2014


New handbook for standardised measurement of plant functional traits worldwide
journal, January 2013

  • Pérez-Harguindeguy, N.; Díaz, S.; Garnier, E.
  • Australian Journal of Botany, Vol. 61, Issue 3
  • DOI: 10.1071/BT12225

Plant responses to drought, salinity and extreme temperatures: towards genetic engineering for stress tolerance
journal, November 2003


Foliar temperature tolerance of temperate and tropical evergreen rain forest trees of Australia
journal, November 2006


Invasive species can handle higher leaf temperature under water stress than Mediterranean natives
journal, June 2011

  • Godoy, Oscar; de Lemos-Filho, José Pires; Valladares, Fernando
  • Environmental and Experimental Botany, Vol. 71, Issue 2
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.envexpbot.2010.12.001

A comparative analysis of photosynthetic recovery from thermal stress: a desert plant case study
journal, June 2014


Correlation between Heat Tolerance and Drought Tolerance in Cereals Demonstrated by Rapid Chlorophyll Fluorescence Tests
journal, December 1988


The influence of leaf size and shape on leaf thermal dynamics: does theory hold up under natural conditions?: Leaf size, shape and temperature
journal, December 2016

  • Leigh, A.; Sevanto, S.; Close, J. D.
  • Plant, Cell & Environment, Vol. 40, Issue 2
  • DOI: 10.1111/pce.12857

Responses of tree species to heat waves and extreme heat events: Tree response to extreme heat
journal, September 2014

  • Teskey, Robert; Wertin, Timothy; Bauweraerts, Ingvar
  • Plant, Cell & Environment, Vol. 38, Issue 9
  • DOI: 10.1111/pce.12417

The energetic and carbon economic origins of leaf thermoregulation
journal, August 2016

  • Michaletz, Sean T.; Weiser, Michael D.; McDowell, Nate G.
  • Nature Plants, Vol. 2, Issue 9
  • DOI: 10.1038/nplants.2016.129

Global patterns of leaf mechanical properties: Global patterns of leaf mechanical properties
journal, January 2011


Deciduousness in a seasonal tropical forest in western Thailand: interannual and intraspecific variation in timing, duration and environmental cues
journal, January 2008

  • Williams, Laura J.; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh; Baker, Patrick J.
  • Oecologia, Vol. 155, Issue 3
  • DOI: 10.1007/s00442-007-0938-1

High-temperature tolerance of a tropical tree, Ficus insipida: methodological reassessment and climate change considerations
journal, January 2010

  • Krause, G. Heinrich; Winter, Klaus; Krause, Barbara
  • Functional Plant Biology, Vol. 37, Issue 9
  • DOI: 10.1071/FP10034

Leaf age and methodology impact assessments of thermotolerance of Coffea arabica
journal, October 2016


Impacts of climate warming on terrestrial ectotherms across latitude
journal, May 2008

  • Deutsch, C. A.; Tewksbury, J. J.; Huey, R. B.
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 105, Issue 18
  • DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0709472105

Leaf thermotolerance in tropical trees from a seasonally dry climate varies along the slow-fast resource acquisition spectrum
journal, September 2017


Photosynthetic thermotolerance of woody savanna species in China is correlated with leaf life span
journal, August 2012

  • Zhang, Jiao-Lin; Poorter, L.; Hao, Guang-You
  • Annals of Botany, Vol. 110, Issue 5
  • DOI: 10.1093/aob/mcs172

Thermal optima of photosynthetic functions and thermostability of photochemistry in cork oak seedlings
journal, October 2003


Relationships among leaf traits of Australian arid zone plants: alternative modes of thermal protection
journal, January 2012

  • Curtis, Ellen M.; Leigh, Andrea; Rayburg, Scott
  • Australian Journal of Botany, Vol. 60, Issue 6
  • DOI: 10.1071/BT11284

Soil moisture-temperature feedbacks at meso-scale during summer heat waves over Western Europe
journal, May 2013

  • Stéfanon, Marc; Drobinski, Philippe; D’Andrea, Fabio
  • Climate Dynamics, Vol. 42, Issue 5-6
  • DOI: 10.1007/s00382-013-1794-9

Native microhabitats better predict tolerance to warming than latitudinal macro-climatic variables in arid-zone plants
journal, March 2016

  • Curtis, Ellen M.; Gollan, John; Murray, Brad R.
  • Journal of Biogeography, Vol. 43, Issue 6
  • DOI: 10.1111/jbi.12713

Perception of climate change
journal, August 2012

  • Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Ruedy, R.
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 109, Issue 37
  • DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1205276109