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Title: The dynamics of simian immunodeficiency virus after depletion of CD8+ cells

Human immunodeficiency virus infection is still one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in the world, with a disproportionate human and economic burden especially in poorer countries. Despite many years of intense research, an aspect that still is not well understood is what (immune) mechanisms control the viral load during the prolonged asymptomatic stage of infection. Because CD8+ T cells have been implicated in this control by multiple lines of evidence, there has been a focus on understanding the potential mechanisms of action of this immune effector population. One type of experiment used to this end has been depleting these cells with monoclonal antibodies in the simian immunodeficiency virus-macaque model and then studying the effect of that depletion on the viral dynamics. In this paper, we review what these experiments have told us. Finally, we emphasize modeling studies to interpret the changes in viral load observed in these experiments, including discussion of alternative models, assumptions and interpretations, as well as potential future experiments.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [2] ; ORCiD logo [2] ; ORCiD logo [3]
  1. Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States). Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division
  2. Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Center for Vaccine Research
  3. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of Lisbon (Portugal). Medical School. Biomathematics Lab.
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-18-26039
Journal ID: ISSN 0105-2896
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396; AI104373; R01 HL117715; AI119346; HL123096; DK113919; UM1 AI126623
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Immunological Reviews
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 285; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 0105-2896
Publisher:
Wiley
Research Org:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE; National Inst. of Health (NIH) (United States)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Biological Science
OSTI Identifier:
1467347

Cardozo, Erwing Fabian, Apetrei, Cristian, Pandrea, Ivona, and Ribeiro, Ruy M. The dynamics of simian immunodeficiency virus after depletion of CD8+ cells. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1111/imr.12691.
Cardozo, Erwing Fabian, Apetrei, Cristian, Pandrea, Ivona, & Ribeiro, Ruy M. The dynamics of simian immunodeficiency virus after depletion of CD8+ cells. United States. doi:10.1111/imr.12691.
Cardozo, Erwing Fabian, Apetrei, Cristian, Pandrea, Ivona, and Ribeiro, Ruy M. 2018. "The dynamics of simian immunodeficiency virus after depletion of CD8+ cells". United States. doi:10.1111/imr.12691.
@article{osti_1467347,
title = {The dynamics of simian immunodeficiency virus after depletion of CD8+ cells},
author = {Cardozo, Erwing Fabian and Apetrei, Cristian and Pandrea, Ivona and Ribeiro, Ruy M.},
abstractNote = {Human immunodeficiency virus infection is still one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in the world, with a disproportionate human and economic burden especially in poorer countries. Despite many years of intense research, an aspect that still is not well understood is what (immune) mechanisms control the viral load during the prolonged asymptomatic stage of infection. Because CD8+ T cells have been implicated in this control by multiple lines of evidence, there has been a focus on understanding the potential mechanisms of action of this immune effector population. One type of experiment used to this end has been depleting these cells with monoclonal antibodies in the simian immunodeficiency virus-macaque model and then studying the effect of that depletion on the viral dynamics. In this paper, we review what these experiments have told us. Finally, we emphasize modeling studies to interpret the changes in viral load observed in these experiments, including discussion of alternative models, assumptions and interpretations, as well as potential future experiments.},
doi = {10.1111/imr.12691},
journal = {Immunological Reviews},
number = 1,
volume = 285,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {8}
}