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Title: Imaging in 3D under pressure: a decade of high-pressure X-ray microtomography development at GSECARS

The high-pressure X-ray microtomography (HPXMT) apparatus has been operating at the GeoSoilEnviroCARS (GSECARS) bending magnet beamline at the Advanced Photon Source since 2005. By combining the powerful synchrotron X-ray source and fast switching between white (for X-ray diffraction) and monochromatic (for absorption imaging) modes, this technique provides the high-pressure community with a unique opportunity to image the three-dimensional volume, texture, and microstructure of materials under high pressure and temperature. The ability to shear the sample with unlimited strain by twisting the two opposed anvils in the apparatus allows shear deformation studies under extreme pressure and temperature to be performed. HPXMT is a powerful tool for studying the physical properties of both crystalline and non-crystalline materials under high pressure and high temperature. Over the past 10 years, continuous effort has been put into technical development, modifications to improve the overall performance, and additional probing techniques to meet users’ needs. Here in this paper, we present an up-to-date report on the HPXMT system, a brief review of some of its many exciting scientific applications, and a discussion of future developments.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). GeoSoilEnviroCARS, Center for Advanced Radiation Sources
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357; FG02-94ER14466
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Progress in Earth and Planetary Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 3; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2197-4284
Publisher:
Springer Open
Research Org:
Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); National Science Foundation (NSF)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; High pressure; Tomography; Synchrotron; Density; Rotation; Shear; Non-crystalline; Elasticity
OSTI Identifier:
1466600

Yu, Tony, Wang, Yanbin, and Rivers, Mark L. Imaging in 3D under pressure: a decade of high-pressure X-ray microtomography development at GSECARS. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1186/s40645-016-0093-6.
Yu, Tony, Wang, Yanbin, & Rivers, Mark L. Imaging in 3D under pressure: a decade of high-pressure X-ray microtomography development at GSECARS. United States. doi:10.1186/s40645-016-0093-6.
Yu, Tony, Wang, Yanbin, and Rivers, Mark L. 2016. "Imaging in 3D under pressure: a decade of high-pressure X-ray microtomography development at GSECARS". United States. doi:10.1186/s40645-016-0093-6. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1466600.
@article{osti_1466600,
title = {Imaging in 3D under pressure: a decade of high-pressure X-ray microtomography development at GSECARS},
author = {Yu, Tony and Wang, Yanbin and Rivers, Mark L.},
abstractNote = {The high-pressure X-ray microtomography (HPXMT) apparatus has been operating at the GeoSoilEnviroCARS (GSECARS) bending magnet beamline at the Advanced Photon Source since 2005. By combining the powerful synchrotron X-ray source and fast switching between white (for X-ray diffraction) and monochromatic (for absorption imaging) modes, this technique provides the high-pressure community with a unique opportunity to image the three-dimensional volume, texture, and microstructure of materials under high pressure and temperature. The ability to shear the sample with unlimited strain by twisting the two opposed anvils in the apparatus allows shear deformation studies under extreme pressure and temperature to be performed. HPXMT is a powerful tool for studying the physical properties of both crystalline and non-crystalline materials under high pressure and high temperature. Over the past 10 years, continuous effort has been put into technical development, modifications to improve the overall performance, and additional probing techniques to meet users’ needs. Here in this paper, we present an up-to-date report on the HPXMT system, a brief review of some of its many exciting scientific applications, and a discussion of future developments.},
doi = {10.1186/s40645-016-0093-6},
journal = {Progress in Earth and Planetary Science},
number = 1,
volume = 3,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {6}
}