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Title: Light-trapping for room temperature Bose-Einstein condensation in InGaAs quantum wells

We demonstrate the possibility of room-temperature, thermal equilibrium Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of exciton-polaritons in a multiple quantum well (QW) system composed of InGaAs quantum wells surrounded by InP barriers, allowing for the emission of light near telecommunication wavelengths. The QWs are embedded in a cavity consisting of double slanted pore (SP2) photonic crystals composed of InP. We consider exciton-polaritons that result from the strong coupling between the multiple quantum well excitons and photons in the lowest planar guided mode within the photonic band gap (PBG) of the photonic crystal cavity. The collective coupling of three QWs results in a vacuum Rabi splitting of 3% of the bare exciton recombination energy. Due to the full three-dimensional PBG exhibited by the SP2 photonic crystal (16% gap to mid-gap frequency ratio), the radiative decay of polaritons is eliminated in all directions. Due to the short exciton-phonon scattering time in InGaAs quantum wells of 0.5 ps and the exciton non-radiative decay time of 200 ps at room temperature, polaritons can achieve thermal equilibrium with the host lattice to form an equilibrium BEC. Using a SP2 photonic crystal with a lattice constant of a = 516 nm, a unit cell height of $$\sqrt{2α}$$=730 nm and a pore radius of 0.305a = 157 nm, light in the lowest planar guided mode is strongly localized in the central slab layer. The central slab layer consists of 3 nm InGaAs quantum wells with 7 nm InP barriers, in which excitons have a recombination energy of 0.944 eV, a binding energy of 7 meV and a Bohr radius of a B = 10 nm. We take the exciton recombination energy to be detuned 35 meV above the lowest guided photonic mode so that an exciton-polariton has a photonic fraction of approximately 97% per QW. This increases the energy range of small-effective-mass photonlike states and increases the critical temperature for the onset of a Bose-Einstein condensate. With three quantum wells in the central slab layer, the strong light confinement results in light-matter coupling strength of ℏΩ = 13.7 meV. Finally, assuming an exciton density per QW of (15a B) -2, well below the saturation density, in a 2-D box-trap with a side length of 10 to 500 µm, we predict thermal equilibrium Bose-Einstein condensation well above room temperature.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-06ER46347
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Optics Express
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 24; Journal Issue: 13; Journal ID: ISSN 1094-4087
Publisher:
Optical Society of America (OSA)
Research Org:
Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE; Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS
OSTI Identifier:
1466583

Vasudev, Pranai, Jiang, Jian-Hua, and John, Sajeev. Light-trapping for room temperature Bose-Einstein condensation in InGaAs quantum wells. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1364/OE.24.014010.
Vasudev, Pranai, Jiang, Jian-Hua, & John, Sajeev. Light-trapping for room temperature Bose-Einstein condensation in InGaAs quantum wells. United States. doi:10.1364/OE.24.014010.
Vasudev, Pranai, Jiang, Jian-Hua, and John, Sajeev. 2016. "Light-trapping for room temperature Bose-Einstein condensation in InGaAs quantum wells". United States. doi:10.1364/OE.24.014010. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1466583.
@article{osti_1466583,
title = {Light-trapping for room temperature Bose-Einstein condensation in InGaAs quantum wells},
author = {Vasudev, Pranai and Jiang, Jian-Hua and John, Sajeev},
abstractNote = {We demonstrate the possibility of room-temperature, thermal equilibrium Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of exciton-polaritons in a multiple quantum well (QW) system composed of InGaAs quantum wells surrounded by InP barriers, allowing for the emission of light near telecommunication wavelengths. The QWs are embedded in a cavity consisting of double slanted pore (SP2) photonic crystals composed of InP. We consider exciton-polaritons that result from the strong coupling between the multiple quantum well excitons and photons in the lowest planar guided mode within the photonic band gap (PBG) of the photonic crystal cavity. The collective coupling of three QWs results in a vacuum Rabi splitting of 3% of the bare exciton recombination energy. Due to the full three-dimensional PBG exhibited by the SP2 photonic crystal (16% gap to mid-gap frequency ratio), the radiative decay of polaritons is eliminated in all directions. Due to the short exciton-phonon scattering time in InGaAs quantum wells of 0.5 ps and the exciton non-radiative decay time of 200 ps at room temperature, polaritons can achieve thermal equilibrium with the host lattice to form an equilibrium BEC. Using a SP2 photonic crystal with a lattice constant of a = 516 nm, a unit cell height of $\sqrt{2α}$=730 nm and a pore radius of 0.305a = 157 nm, light in the lowest planar guided mode is strongly localized in the central slab layer. The central slab layer consists of 3 nm InGaAs quantum wells with 7 nm InP barriers, in which excitons have a recombination energy of 0.944 eV, a binding energy of 7 meV and a Bohr radius of aB = 10 nm. We take the exciton recombination energy to be detuned 35 meV above the lowest guided photonic mode so that an exciton-polariton has a photonic fraction of approximately 97% per QW. This increases the energy range of small-effective-mass photonlike states and increases the critical temperature for the onset of a Bose-Einstein condensate. With three quantum wells in the central slab layer, the strong light confinement results in light-matter coupling strength of ℏΩ = 13.7 meV. Finally, assuming an exciton density per QW of (15aB)-2, well below the saturation density, in a 2-D box-trap with a side length of 10 to 500 µm, we predict thermal equilibrium Bose-Einstein condensation well above room temperature.},
doi = {10.1364/OE.24.014010},
journal = {Optics Express},
number = 13,
volume = 24,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {6}
}