skip to main content

DOE PAGESDOE PAGES

Title: Developing and diagnosing climate change indicators of regional aerosol optical properties

Given the importance of aerosol particles to radiative transfer via aerosol-radiation interactions, a methodology for tracking and diagnosing causes of temporal changes in regional-scale aerosol populations is illustrated. The aerosol optical properties tracked include estimates of total columnar burden (aerosol optical depth, AOD), dominant size mode (Angstrom exponent, AE), and relative magnitude of radiation scattering versus absorption (single scattering albedo, SSA), along with metrics of the structure of the spatial field of these properties. Over well-defined regions of North America, there are generally negative temporal trends in mean and extreme AOD, and SSA. These are consistent with lower aerosol burdens and transition towards a relatively absorbing aerosol, driven primarily by declining sulfur dioxide emissions. Conversely, more remote regions are characterized by increasing mean and extreme AOD that is attributed to increased local wildfire emissions and long-range (transcontinental) transport. Regional and national reductions in anthropogenic emissions of aerosol precursors are leading to declining spatial autocorrelation in the aerosol fields and increased importance of local anthropogenic emissions in dictating aerosol burdens. However, synoptic types associated with high aerosol burdens are intensifying (becoming more warm and humid), and thus changes in synoptic meteorology may be offsetting aerosol burden reductions associated with emissions legislation.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ; ORCiD logo [3]
  1. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences; Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Environmental Science Division
  2. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States)
  3. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences; Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Pervasive Technology Inst.
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357; NNX14AP56H; NNX16AG31G
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Research Org:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1466336

Sullivan, Ryan C., Levy, Robert C., da Silva, Arlindo M., and Pryor, Sara C.. Developing and diagnosing climate change indicators of regional aerosol optical properties. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-18402-x.
Sullivan, Ryan C., Levy, Robert C., da Silva, Arlindo M., & Pryor, Sara C.. Developing and diagnosing climate change indicators of regional aerosol optical properties. United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-18402-x.
Sullivan, Ryan C., Levy, Robert C., da Silva, Arlindo M., and Pryor, Sara C.. 2017. "Developing and diagnosing climate change indicators of regional aerosol optical properties". United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-18402-x. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1466336.
@article{osti_1466336,
title = {Developing and diagnosing climate change indicators of regional aerosol optical properties},
author = {Sullivan, Ryan C. and Levy, Robert C. and da Silva, Arlindo M. and Pryor, Sara C.},
abstractNote = {Given the importance of aerosol particles to radiative transfer via aerosol-radiation interactions, a methodology for tracking and diagnosing causes of temporal changes in regional-scale aerosol populations is illustrated. The aerosol optical properties tracked include estimates of total columnar burden (aerosol optical depth, AOD), dominant size mode (Angstrom exponent, AE), and relative magnitude of radiation scattering versus absorption (single scattering albedo, SSA), along with metrics of the structure of the spatial field of these properties. Over well-defined regions of North America, there are generally negative temporal trends in mean and extreme AOD, and SSA. These are consistent with lower aerosol burdens and transition towards a relatively absorbing aerosol, driven primarily by declining sulfur dioxide emissions. Conversely, more remote regions are characterized by increasing mean and extreme AOD that is attributed to increased local wildfire emissions and long-range (transcontinental) transport. Regional and national reductions in anthropogenic emissions of aerosol precursors are leading to declining spatial autocorrelation in the aerosol fields and increased importance of local anthropogenic emissions in dictating aerosol burdens. However, synoptic types associated with high aerosol burdens are intensifying (becoming more warm and humid), and thus changes in synoptic meteorology may be offsetting aerosol burden reductions associated with emissions legislation.},
doi = {10.1038/s41598-017-18402-x},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = 1,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}