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Title: Enhanced photoluminescence in air-suspended carbon nanotubes by oxygen doping

We report photoluminescence (PL) imaging and spectroscopy of air-suspended carbon nanotubes (CNTs) before and after exposure to a brief (20 s) UV/ozone treatment. These spectra show enhanced PL intensities in 10 out of 11 nanotubes that were measured, by as much as 5-fold. This enhancement in the luminescence efficiency is caused by oxygen defects which trap excitons. We also observe an average 3-fold increase in the D-band Raman intensity further indicating the creation of defects. Previous demonstrations of oxygen doping have been carried out on surfactantcoated carbon nanotubes dissolved in solution, thus requiring substantial longer ozone/UV exposure times (~15 h). Here, the ozone treatment is more efficient because of the surface exposure of the air-suspended CNTs. In addition to enhanced PL intensities, we observe narrowing of the emission linewidth by 3–10 nm. Finally, this ability to control and engineer defects in CNTs is important for realizing several optoelectronic applications such as light-emitting diodes and single photon sources.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4]
  1. Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Ming Hsieh Dept. of Electrical Engineering
  2. Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
  3. Korea Polytechnic Univ., Shiheung-shi, Gyunggi-do (South Korea). Dept. of Mechatronics Engineering
  4. Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Ming Hsieh Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-07ER46376
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 109; Journal Issue: 15; Journal ID: ISSN 0003-6951
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Research Org:
Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE; National Science Foundation (NSF)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
OSTI Identifier:
1465769
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1328715

Chen, Jihan, Dhall, Rohan, Hou, Bingya, Yang, Sisi, Wang, Bo, Kang, Daejin, and Cronin, Stephen B. Enhanced photoluminescence in air-suspended carbon nanotubes by oxygen doping. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1063/1.4964461.
Chen, Jihan, Dhall, Rohan, Hou, Bingya, Yang, Sisi, Wang, Bo, Kang, Daejin, & Cronin, Stephen B. Enhanced photoluminescence in air-suspended carbon nanotubes by oxygen doping. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4964461.
Chen, Jihan, Dhall, Rohan, Hou, Bingya, Yang, Sisi, Wang, Bo, Kang, Daejin, and Cronin, Stephen B. 2016. "Enhanced photoluminescence in air-suspended carbon nanotubes by oxygen doping". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4964461. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1465769.
@article{osti_1465769,
title = {Enhanced photoluminescence in air-suspended carbon nanotubes by oxygen doping},
author = {Chen, Jihan and Dhall, Rohan and Hou, Bingya and Yang, Sisi and Wang, Bo and Kang, Daejin and Cronin, Stephen B.},
abstractNote = {We report photoluminescence (PL) imaging and spectroscopy of air-suspended carbon nanotubes (CNTs) before and after exposure to a brief (20 s) UV/ozone treatment. These spectra show enhanced PL intensities in 10 out of 11 nanotubes that were measured, by as much as 5-fold. This enhancement in the luminescence efficiency is caused by oxygen defects which trap excitons. We also observe an average 3-fold increase in the D-band Raman intensity further indicating the creation of defects. Previous demonstrations of oxygen doping have been carried out on surfactantcoated carbon nanotubes dissolved in solution, thus requiring substantial longer ozone/UV exposure times (~15 h). Here, the ozone treatment is more efficient because of the surface exposure of the air-suspended CNTs. In addition to enhanced PL intensities, we observe narrowing of the emission linewidth by 3–10 nm. Finally, this ability to control and engineer defects in CNTs is important for realizing several optoelectronic applications such as light-emitting diodes and single photon sources.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4964461},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 15,
volume = 109,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {10}
}