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Title: A New Black Carbon Sensor for Dense Air Quality Monitoring Networks

Abstract

Low-cost air pollution sensors are emerging and increasingly being deployed in densely distributed wireless networks that provide more spatial resolution than is typical in traditional monitoring of ambient air quality. However, a low-cost option to measure black carbon (BC)—a major component of particulate matter pollution associated with adverse human health risks—is missing. This paper presents a new BC sensor designed to fill this gap, the Aerosol Black Carbon Detector (ABCD), which incorporates a compact weatherproof enclosure, solar-powered rechargeable battery, and cellular communication to enable long-term, remote operation. This paper also demonstrates a data processing methodology that reduces the ABCD’s sensitivity to ambient temperature fluctuations, and therefore improves measurement performance in unconditioned operating environments (e.g., outdoors). A fleet of over 100 ABCDs was operated outdoors in collocation with a commercial BC instrument (Magee Scientific, Model AE33) housed inside a regulatory air quality monitoring station. The measurement performance of the 105 ABCDs is comparable to the AE33. The fleet-average precision and accuracy, expressed in terms of mean absolute percentage error, are 9.2 ± 0.8% (relative to the fleet average data) and 24.6 ± 0.9% (relative to the AE33 data), respectively (fleet-average ± 90% confidence interval).

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering
  3. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); Environmental Defense Fund (EDF); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Center for Effective Global Action (CEGA)
Contributing Org.:
Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD), San Francisco, CA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
1465435
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Sensors
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1424-8220
Publisher:
MDPI AG
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; air quality monitoring; black carbon; wireless sensor network

Citation Formats

Caubel, Julien, Cados, Troy, and Kirchstetter, Thomas. A New Black Carbon Sensor for Dense Air Quality Monitoring Networks. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.3390/s18030738.
Caubel, Julien, Cados, Troy, & Kirchstetter, Thomas. A New Black Carbon Sensor for Dense Air Quality Monitoring Networks. United States. doi:10.3390/s18030738.
Caubel, Julien, Cados, Troy, and Kirchstetter, Thomas. Thu . "A New Black Carbon Sensor for Dense Air Quality Monitoring Networks". United States. doi:10.3390/s18030738. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1465435.
@article{osti_1465435,
title = {A New Black Carbon Sensor for Dense Air Quality Monitoring Networks},
author = {Caubel, Julien and Cados, Troy and Kirchstetter, Thomas},
abstractNote = {Low-cost air pollution sensors are emerging and increasingly being deployed in densely distributed wireless networks that provide more spatial resolution than is typical in traditional monitoring of ambient air quality. However, a low-cost option to measure black carbon (BC)—a major component of particulate matter pollution associated with adverse human health risks—is missing. This paper presents a new BC sensor designed to fill this gap, the Aerosol Black Carbon Detector (ABCD), which incorporates a compact weatherproof enclosure, solar-powered rechargeable battery, and cellular communication to enable long-term, remote operation. This paper also demonstrates a data processing methodology that reduces the ABCD’s sensitivity to ambient temperature fluctuations, and therefore improves measurement performance in unconditioned operating environments (e.g., outdoors). A fleet of over 100 ABCDs was operated outdoors in collocation with a commercial BC instrument (Magee Scientific, Model AE33) housed inside a regulatory air quality monitoring station. The measurement performance of the 105 ABCDs is comparable to the AE33. The fleet-average precision and accuracy, expressed in terms of mean absolute percentage error, are 9.2 ± 0.8% (relative to the fleet average data) and 24.6 ± 0.9% (relative to the AE33 data), respectively (fleet-average ± 90% confidence interval).},
doi = {10.3390/s18030738},
journal = {Sensors},
number = 3,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}

Journal Article:
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