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Title: Multiple mechanisms generate a universal scaling with dissipation for the air-water gas transfer velocity

A large corpus of field and laboratory experiments support the finding that the water side transfer velocity kL of sparingly soluble gases near air-water interfaces scales as k L~(νε) 1/4, where ν is the kinematic water viscosity and ε is the mean turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate. Originally predicted from surface renewal theory, this scaling appears to hold for marine and coastal systems and across many environmental conditions. It is shown that multiple approaches to representing the effects of turbulence on kL lead to this expression when the Kolmogorov microscale is assumed to be the most efficient transporting eddy near the interface. The approaches considered range from simplified surface renewal schemes with distinct models for renewal durations, scaling and dimensional considerations, and a new structure function approach derived using analogies between scalar and momentum transfer. The work offers a new perspective as to why the aforementioned 1/4 scaling is robust.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Nicholas School of the Environment; Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering
  2. Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0006967; SC0011461; NSF-EAR-1344703; NSF-DGE-1068871; NSF-AGS-1112938
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Geophysical Research Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 44; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 0094-8276
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Research Org:
Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation (NSF); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; turbulence; air‐water exchange; gas transfer velocity; surface renewal; Kolmogorov scaling; surface divergence
OSTI Identifier:
1465345
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1402208

Katul, Gabriel, and Liu, Heping. Multiple mechanisms generate a universal scaling with dissipation for the air-water gas transfer velocity. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1002/2016GL072256.
Katul, Gabriel, & Liu, Heping. Multiple mechanisms generate a universal scaling with dissipation for the air-water gas transfer velocity. United States. doi:10.1002/2016GL072256.
Katul, Gabriel, and Liu, Heping. 2017. "Multiple mechanisms generate a universal scaling with dissipation for the air-water gas transfer velocity". United States. doi:10.1002/2016GL072256. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1465345.
@article{osti_1465345,
title = {Multiple mechanisms generate a universal scaling with dissipation for the air-water gas transfer velocity},
author = {Katul, Gabriel and Liu, Heping},
abstractNote = {A large corpus of field and laboratory experiments support the finding that the water side transfer velocity kL of sparingly soluble gases near air-water interfaces scales as kL~(νε)1/4, where ν is the kinematic water viscosity and ε is the mean turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate. Originally predicted from surface renewal theory, this scaling appears to hold for marine and coastal systems and across many environmental conditions. It is shown that multiple approaches to representing the effects of turbulence on kL lead to this expression when the Kolmogorov microscale is assumed to be the most efficient transporting eddy near the interface. The approaches considered range from simplified surface renewal schemes with distinct models for renewal durations, scaling and dimensional considerations, and a new structure function approach derived using analogies between scalar and momentum transfer. The work offers a new perspective as to why the aforementioned 1/4 scaling is robust.},
doi = {10.1002/2016GL072256},
journal = {Geophysical Research Letters},
number = 4,
volume = 44,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {2}
}