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Title: Methods for rejecting daytime waste heat to outer space

Abstract

We report that outer space constitutes an extremely low temperature (T ~ 4 K) thermodynamic reservoir of boundless thermal capacity, with the potential to serve as a cold reservoir for cooling objects to sub-ambient temperatures in the daytime. For example, assuming a perfect emitter at 300 K, the theoretical black-body heat transfer rate to space can be calculated to be 450 Wm-2 [1]. However, for terrestrial objects, the atmosphere serves as a highly effective infrared (IR) insulator, as well as a heat source via radiation, convection and conduction to the object when cooled to sub-ambient temperatures.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. USDOE Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1464730
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
National Science Review
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 2095-5138
Publisher:
China Science Publishing
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Stark, Addison K. Methods for rejecting daytime waste heat to outer space. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1093/nsr/nwx052.
Stark, Addison K. Methods for rejecting daytime waste heat to outer space. United States. doi:10.1093/nsr/nwx052.
Stark, Addison K. Tue . "Methods for rejecting daytime waste heat to outer space". United States. doi:10.1093/nsr/nwx052. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1464730.
@article{osti_1464730,
title = {Methods for rejecting daytime waste heat to outer space},
author = {Stark, Addison K.},
abstractNote = {We report that outer space constitutes an extremely low temperature (T ~ 4 K) thermodynamic reservoir of boundless thermal capacity, with the potential to serve as a cold reservoir for cooling objects to sub-ambient temperatures in the daytime. For example, assuming a perfect emitter at 300 K, the theoretical black-body heat transfer rate to space can be calculated to be 450 Wm-2 [1]. However, for terrestrial objects, the atmosphere serves as a highly effective infrared (IR) insulator, as well as a heat source via radiation, convection and conduction to the object when cooled to sub-ambient temperatures.},
doi = {10.1093/nsr/nwx052},
journal = {National Science Review},
number = 6,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {5}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Cited by: 1 work
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Figures / Tables:

Fig. 1 Fig. 1: (A) The spectral power density of the incident solar irradiance and blackbody radiation from a room temperature emitter are plotted. Due to the order of magnitude difference, a highly effective selective emitter is required to simultaneously reflect the solar irradiance while still emitting within the 8-13μm sky-window. (B)more » A schematic of the amorphous hybrid polymer-glass metamaterial with reflective silver metal backer (Adapted from [5]).« less

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Works referenced in this record:

Ultrabroadband Photonic Structures To Achieve High-Performance Daytime Radiative Cooling
journal, March 2013

  • Rephaeli, Eden; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui
  • Nano Letters, Vol. 13, Issue 4, p. 1457-1461
  • DOI: 10.1021/nl4004283

The radiative cooling of selective surfaces
journal, May 1975


Scalable-manufactured randomized glass-polymer hybrid metamaterial for daytime radiative cooling
journal, February 2017


Passive radiative cooling below ambient air temperature under direct sunlight
journal, November 2014

  • Raman, Aaswath P.; Anoma, Marc Abou; Zhu, Linxiao
  • Nature, Vol. 515, Issue 7528, p. 540-544
  • DOI: 10.1038/nature13883

    Figures / Tables found in this record:

      Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.