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Title: Using time-resolved penumbral imaging to measure low hot spot x-ray emission signals from capsule implosions at the National Ignition Facility

Abstract

Here, we have developed and fielded a new x-ray pinhole-imaging snout that exploits time-resolved penumbral imaging of low-emission hot spots in capsule implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We report on results for a series of indirectly driven Be capsule implosions that aim at measuring x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) spectra at extreme density conditions near stagnation. In these implosions, x-ray emission at stagnation is reduced by 100 – 1000x compared to standard inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions to mitigate undesired continuum background in the XRTS spectra. Our snout design enables not only measurements of peak x-ray emission times, t o, where standard ICF diagnostics would not record any signal, but also allows for inference of hot spots shapes. Measurement of t o is crucial to account for shot-to-shot variations in implosion velocity and therefore to benchmark the achieved plasma conditions between shots and against radiation hydrodynamics simulations. Additionally, we used differential filtering to infer a hot spot temperature of 520 ± 80 eV, which is in good agreement with predictions from radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Here, we find that, despite fluctuations of the x-ray flash intensity of up to 5x, the emission time history is similar from shot tomore » shot, and slightly asymmetric with respect to peak x-ray emission.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [2];  [5];  [6];  [1];  [2];  [6];  [2];  [7];  [8];  [6];  [9];  [2]
  1. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  2. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  3. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  4. Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany)
  5. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. Rostock, Rostock (Germany)
  6. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  7. GSI Helmholtzzentrum f ur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)
  8. Univ. Rostock, Rostock (Germany)
  9. Univ. Rostock, Rostock (Germamy); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) (SC-24)
OSTI Identifier:
1464605
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1474201
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-76SF00515; AC52-07NA27344; 18-ERD-033
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Review of Scientific Instruments
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 89; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION

Citation Formats

Glenzer, Siegfried H., Bishel, D. T., Bachmann, B., Yi, A., Kraus, D., Divol, L., Bethkenhagen, M., Falcone, R. W., Fletcher, L. B., Landen, O. L., MacDonald, M. J., Masters, N., Neumayer, P., Remer, R., Saunders, A. M., Witte, B., and Doppner, T. Using time-resolved penumbral imaging to measure low hot spot x-ray emission signals from capsule implosions at the National Ignition Facility. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1063/1.5037073.
Glenzer, Siegfried H., Bishel, D. T., Bachmann, B., Yi, A., Kraus, D., Divol, L., Bethkenhagen, M., Falcone, R. W., Fletcher, L. B., Landen, O. L., MacDonald, M. J., Masters, N., Neumayer, P., Remer, R., Saunders, A. M., Witte, B., & Doppner, T. Using time-resolved penumbral imaging to measure low hot spot x-ray emission signals from capsule implosions at the National Ignition Facility. United States. doi:10.1063/1.5037073.
Glenzer, Siegfried H., Bishel, D. T., Bachmann, B., Yi, A., Kraus, D., Divol, L., Bethkenhagen, M., Falcone, R. W., Fletcher, L. B., Landen, O. L., MacDonald, M. J., Masters, N., Neumayer, P., Remer, R., Saunders, A. M., Witte, B., and Doppner, T. Thu . "Using time-resolved penumbral imaging to measure low hot spot x-ray emission signals from capsule implosions at the National Ignition Facility". United States. doi:10.1063/1.5037073. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1464605.
@article{osti_1464605,
title = {Using time-resolved penumbral imaging to measure low hot spot x-ray emission signals from capsule implosions at the National Ignition Facility},
author = {Glenzer, Siegfried H. and Bishel, D. T. and Bachmann, B. and Yi, A. and Kraus, D. and Divol, L. and Bethkenhagen, M. and Falcone, R. W. and Fletcher, L. B. and Landen, O. L. and MacDonald, M. J. and Masters, N. and Neumayer, P. and Remer, R. and Saunders, A. M. and Witte, B. and Doppner, T.},
abstractNote = {Here, we have developed and fielded a new x-ray pinhole-imaging snout that exploits time-resolved penumbral imaging of low-emission hot spots in capsule implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We report on results for a series of indirectly driven Be capsule implosions that aim at measuring x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) spectra at extreme density conditions near stagnation. In these implosions, x-ray emission at stagnation is reduced by 100 – 1000x compared to standard inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions to mitigate undesired continuum background in the XRTS spectra. Our snout design enables not only measurements of peak x-ray emission times, to, where standard ICF diagnostics would not record any signal, but also allows for inference of hot spots shapes. Measurement of to is crucial to account for shot-to-shot variations in implosion velocity and therefore to benchmark the achieved plasma conditions between shots and against radiation hydrodynamics simulations. Additionally, we used differential filtering to infer a hot spot temperature of 520 ± 80 eV, which is in good agreement with predictions from radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Here, we find that, despite fluctuations of the x-ray flash intensity of up to 5x, the emission time history is similar from shot to shot, and slightly asymmetric with respect to peak x-ray emission.},
doi = {10.1063/1.5037073},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 10,
volume = 89,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}

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