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Title: A shadow detector for photosynthesis efficiency

Plants tolerate large variations in the intensity of the light environment by controlling the efficiency of solar to chemical energy conversion. To do this, plants have a mechanism to detect the intensity, duration, and change in light as they experience moving shadows, flickering light, and cloud cover. Sugars are the primary products of CO 2 fixation, a metabolic pathway that is rate limited by this solar energy conversion. We propose that sugar is a signal encoding information about the intensity, duration and change in the light environment. We previously showed that the Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G protein complex including its receptor-like Regulator of G signaling protein, AtRGS1, detects both the concentration and the exposure time of sugars [Fu, et al 2014 Cell 156: 1084–1095]. This unique property, designated dose-duration reciprocity, is a behavior that emerges from the system architecture / system motif. Here, we show that another property of the signaling system is to detect large changes in light while at the same time, filtering types of fluctuation in light that do not affect photosynthesis efficiency. When AtRGS1 is genetically ablated, photosynthesis efficiency is reduced in a changing-but not a constant-light environment. Mathematical modeling revealed that information about changes in themore » light environment is encoded in the amount of free AtRGS1 that becomes compartmentalized following stimulation. We propose that this property determines when to adjust photosynthetic efficiency in an environment where light intensity changes abruptly caused by moving shadows on top of a background of light changing gradually from sun rise to sun set and fluctuating light such as that caused by fluttering leaves.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)
  2. Stevens Inst. of Technology, Hoboken, NJ (United States)
  3. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-05ER15671
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Theoretical Biology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 414; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-5193
Publisher:
Elsevier
Research Org:
Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1463110
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1411090

Liao, Kang-Ling, Jones, Roger D., McCarter, Patrick, Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral, Draper, James A., Elston, Timothy C., Kramer, David, and Jones, Alan M.. A shadow detector for photosynthesis efficiency. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1016/j.jtbi.2016.11.027.
Liao, Kang-Ling, Jones, Roger D., McCarter, Patrick, Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral, Draper, James A., Elston, Timothy C., Kramer, David, & Jones, Alan M.. A shadow detector for photosynthesis efficiency. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jtbi.2016.11.027.
Liao, Kang-Ling, Jones, Roger D., McCarter, Patrick, Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral, Draper, James A., Elston, Timothy C., Kramer, David, and Jones, Alan M.. 2016. "A shadow detector for photosynthesis efficiency". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jtbi.2016.11.027. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1463110.
@article{osti_1463110,
title = {A shadow detector for photosynthesis efficiency},
author = {Liao, Kang-Ling and Jones, Roger D. and McCarter, Patrick and Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral and Draper, James A. and Elston, Timothy C. and Kramer, David and Jones, Alan M.},
abstractNote = {Plants tolerate large variations in the intensity of the light environment by controlling the efficiency of solar to chemical energy conversion. To do this, plants have a mechanism to detect the intensity, duration, and change in light as they experience moving shadows, flickering light, and cloud cover. Sugars are the primary products of CO2 fixation, a metabolic pathway that is rate limited by this solar energy conversion. We propose that sugar is a signal encoding information about the intensity, duration and change in the light environment. We previously showed that the Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G protein complex including its receptor-like Regulator of G signaling protein, AtRGS1, detects both the concentration and the exposure time of sugars [Fu, et al 2014 Cell 156: 1084–1095]. This unique property, designated dose-duration reciprocity, is a behavior that emerges from the system architecture / system motif. Here, we show that another property of the signaling system is to detect large changes in light while at the same time, filtering types of fluctuation in light that do not affect photosynthesis efficiency. When AtRGS1 is genetically ablated, photosynthesis efficiency is reduced in a changing-but not a constant-light environment. Mathematical modeling revealed that information about changes in the light environment is encoded in the amount of free AtRGS1 that becomes compartmentalized following stimulation. We propose that this property determines when to adjust photosynthetic efficiency in an environment where light intensity changes abruptly caused by moving shadows on top of a background of light changing gradually from sun rise to sun set and fluctuating light such as that caused by fluttering leaves.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jtbi.2016.11.027},
journal = {Journal of Theoretical Biology},
number = C,
volume = 414,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {12}
}