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Title: Expression of Gre2p improves tolerance of engineered xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae to glycolaldehyde under xylose metabolism

Engineered S. cerevisiae employing the xylose reductase pathway enables efficient xylose valorization to fuels and chemicals. However, toxicity of thermochemically pretreated biomass hydrolysate on S. cerevisiae is one of the key technical challenges to upgrade biomass-derived sugars including xylose and glucose into high-value products. We investigated the effect of glycolaldehyde, one of the biomass-derived highly toxic aldehyde compounds, and its combinatorial inhibitory effect with other major fermentation inhibitors commonly found in plant hydrolysate such as methylglyoxal, 5-HMF, furfural, vanillin, and acetic acid on engineered xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae in xylose and/or glucose media. We elucidated that glycolaldehyde and methylglyoxal are the key inhibitory short-aliphatic aldehydes on engineered xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae in xylose-containing medium. Indeed, the degree of toxicity of these tested fermentation inhibitors varies with the sole carbon source of the medium. We demonstrate that genome integration of an extra copy of autologous GRE2 with its native promotor substantially improved the toxic tolerance of engineered xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae to major inhibitory compounds including glycolaldehyde in the xylose-containing medium, and xylose-rich, lignocellulosic hydrolysate derived from Miscanthus giganteus, and concurrently improved the ethanol fermentation profile. In conclusion, outcomes of this study will aid the development of next-generation robust S. cerevisiae strains for efficientmore » fermentation of hexose and pentose sugars found in biomass hydrolysate.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [3] ;  [3] ;  [3]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)
  2. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Northwestern Univ. Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)
  3. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5100-72078
Journal ID: ISSN 0175-7598
Grant/Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 102; Journal Issue: 18; Journal ID: ISSN 0175-7598
Publisher:
Springer
Research Org:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; S. cerevisiae; xylose; glycolaldehyde; aldehydes toxicity; Gre2p
OSTI Identifier:
1462470

Jayakody, Lahiru N., Turner, Timothy Lee, Yun, Eun Ju, Kong, In Iok, Liu, Jing -Jing, and Jin, Yong -Su. Expression of Gre2p improves tolerance of engineered xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae to glycolaldehyde under xylose metabolism. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1007/s00253-018-9216-x.
Jayakody, Lahiru N., Turner, Timothy Lee, Yun, Eun Ju, Kong, In Iok, Liu, Jing -Jing, & Jin, Yong -Su. Expression of Gre2p improves tolerance of engineered xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae to glycolaldehyde under xylose metabolism. United States. doi:10.1007/s00253-018-9216-x.
Jayakody, Lahiru N., Turner, Timothy Lee, Yun, Eun Ju, Kong, In Iok, Liu, Jing -Jing, and Jin, Yong -Su. 2018. "Expression of Gre2p improves tolerance of engineered xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae to glycolaldehyde under xylose metabolism". United States. doi:10.1007/s00253-018-9216-x.
@article{osti_1462470,
title = {Expression of Gre2p improves tolerance of engineered xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae to glycolaldehyde under xylose metabolism},
author = {Jayakody, Lahiru N. and Turner, Timothy Lee and Yun, Eun Ju and Kong, In Iok and Liu, Jing -Jing and Jin, Yong -Su},
abstractNote = {Engineered S. cerevisiae employing the xylose reductase pathway enables efficient xylose valorization to fuels and chemicals. However, toxicity of thermochemically pretreated biomass hydrolysate on S. cerevisiae is one of the key technical challenges to upgrade biomass-derived sugars including xylose and glucose into high-value products. We investigated the effect of glycolaldehyde, one of the biomass-derived highly toxic aldehyde compounds, and its combinatorial inhibitory effect with other major fermentation inhibitors commonly found in plant hydrolysate such as methylglyoxal, 5-HMF, furfural, vanillin, and acetic acid on engineered xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae in xylose and/or glucose media. We elucidated that glycolaldehyde and methylglyoxal are the key inhibitory short-aliphatic aldehydes on engineered xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae in xylose-containing medium. Indeed, the degree of toxicity of these tested fermentation inhibitors varies with the sole carbon source of the medium. We demonstrate that genome integration of an extra copy of autologous GRE2 with its native promotor substantially improved the toxic tolerance of engineered xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae to major inhibitory compounds including glycolaldehyde in the xylose-containing medium, and xylose-rich, lignocellulosic hydrolysate derived from Miscanthus giganteus, and concurrently improved the ethanol fermentation profile. In conclusion, outcomes of this study will aid the development of next-generation robust S. cerevisiae strains for efficient fermentation of hexose and pentose sugars found in biomass hydrolysate.},
doi = {10.1007/s00253-018-9216-x},
journal = {Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology},
number = 18,
volume = 102,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {7}
}

Works referenced in this record:

Increased tolerance and conversion of inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates by Saccharomyces cerevisiae
journal, January 2007
  • Almeida, Joao; Modig, Tobias; Petersson, Anneli
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  • DOI: 10.1002/jctb.1676

Partial flow of compressed-hot water through corn stover to enhance hemicellulose sugar recovery and enzymatic digestibility of cellulose
journal, December 2005