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Title: Diverse lignocellulosic feedstocks can achieve high field-scale ethanol yields while providing flexibility for the biorefinery and landscape-level environmental benefits

Increasing the diversity of lignocellulosic feedstocks accepted by a regional biorefinery has the potential to improve the environmental footprint of the facility; harvest, storage, and transportation logistics; and biorefinery economics. However, feedstocks can vary widely in terms of their biomass yields and quality characteristics (chemical composition, moisture content, etc.). To investigate how the diversity of potential biofuel cropping systems and feedstock supply might affect process and field–scale ethanol yields, we processed and experimentally quantified ethanol production from five different herbaceous feedstocks: two annuals (corn stover and energy sorghum) and three perennials (switchgrass, miscanthus, and mixed prairie). The feedstocks were pretreated using ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), hydrolyzed at high solid loading (~17%–20% solids, depending on the feedstock), and fermented separately using microbes engineered to utilize xylose: yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiaeY128) or bacteria ( Zymomonas mobilis8b). The field–scale ethanol yield from each feedstock was dependent on biomass quality and cropping system productivity; however, biomass yield had a greater influence on the ethanol yield for low–productivity crops, while biomass quality was the main driver for ethanol yields from high–yielding crops. The process ethanol yield showed similar variability across years and feedstocks. A low process yield for corn stover was determined to result frommore » inhibition of xylose utilization by unusually elevated levels of hydroxycinnamates ( p–coumaric and ferulic acids) in the untreated biomass and their acid and amide derivatives in the resulting hydrolyzate. This finding highlights the need to better understand factors that influence process ethanol yield and biomass quality. Ultimately we provide evidence that most feedstocks fall within a similar range of process ethanol yield, particularly for the more resistant strain Z. mobilis8b. Furthermore, this supports the claim that the refinery can successfully diversify its feedstock supply, enabling many social and environmental benefits that can accrue due to landscape diversification.« less
Authors:
 [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ;  [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [3]
  1. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
  2. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)
  3. Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0018409; FC02-07ER64494; AC05-76RL01830
Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Global Change Biology. Bioenergy
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 11; Journal ID: ISSN 1757-1693
Publisher:
Wiley
Research Org:
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Biorefinery; Ethanol yield; Feedstock Diversity; Fermentation; Inhibitors; lignocellulosic hydrolyzate; xylose utilization
OSTI Identifier:
1461702
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1461703; OSTI ID: 1483929

Zhang, Yaoping, Oates, Lawrence G., Serate, Jose, Xie, Dan, Pohlmann, Edward, Bukhman, Yury V., Karlen, Steven D., Young, Megan K., Higbee, Alan, Eilert, Dustin, Sanford, Gregg R., Piotrowski, Jeff S., Cavalier, David, Ralph, John, Coon, Joshua J., Sato, Trey K., and Ong, Rebecca G.. Diverse lignocellulosic feedstocks can achieve high field-scale ethanol yields while providing flexibility for the biorefinery and landscape-level environmental benefits. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1111/gcbb.12533.
Zhang, Yaoping, Oates, Lawrence G., Serate, Jose, Xie, Dan, Pohlmann, Edward, Bukhman, Yury V., Karlen, Steven D., Young, Megan K., Higbee, Alan, Eilert, Dustin, Sanford, Gregg R., Piotrowski, Jeff S., Cavalier, David, Ralph, John, Coon, Joshua J., Sato, Trey K., & Ong, Rebecca G.. Diverse lignocellulosic feedstocks can achieve high field-scale ethanol yields while providing flexibility for the biorefinery and landscape-level environmental benefits. United States. doi:10.1111/gcbb.12533.
Zhang, Yaoping, Oates, Lawrence G., Serate, Jose, Xie, Dan, Pohlmann, Edward, Bukhman, Yury V., Karlen, Steven D., Young, Megan K., Higbee, Alan, Eilert, Dustin, Sanford, Gregg R., Piotrowski, Jeff S., Cavalier, David, Ralph, John, Coon, Joshua J., Sato, Trey K., and Ong, Rebecca G.. 2018. "Diverse lignocellulosic feedstocks can achieve high field-scale ethanol yields while providing flexibility for the biorefinery and landscape-level environmental benefits". United States. doi:10.1111/gcbb.12533.
@article{osti_1461702,
title = {Diverse lignocellulosic feedstocks can achieve high field-scale ethanol yields while providing flexibility for the biorefinery and landscape-level environmental benefits},
author = {Zhang, Yaoping and Oates, Lawrence G. and Serate, Jose and Xie, Dan and Pohlmann, Edward and Bukhman, Yury V. and Karlen, Steven D. and Young, Megan K. and Higbee, Alan and Eilert, Dustin and Sanford, Gregg R. and Piotrowski, Jeff S. and Cavalier, David and Ralph, John and Coon, Joshua J. and Sato, Trey K. and Ong, Rebecca G.},
abstractNote = {Increasing the diversity of lignocellulosic feedstocks accepted by a regional biorefinery has the potential to improve the environmental footprint of the facility; harvest, storage, and transportation logistics; and biorefinery economics. However, feedstocks can vary widely in terms of their biomass yields and quality characteristics (chemical composition, moisture content, etc.). To investigate how the diversity of potential biofuel cropping systems and feedstock supply might affect process and field–scale ethanol yields, we processed and experimentally quantified ethanol production from five different herbaceous feedstocks: two annuals (corn stover and energy sorghum) and three perennials (switchgrass, miscanthus, and mixed prairie). The feedstocks were pretreated using ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), hydrolyzed at high solid loading (~17%–20% solids, depending on the feedstock), and fermented separately using microbes engineered to utilize xylose: yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiaeY128) or bacteria (Zymomonas mobilis8b). The field–scale ethanol yield from each feedstock was dependent on biomass quality and cropping system productivity; however, biomass yield had a greater influence on the ethanol yield for low–productivity crops, while biomass quality was the main driver for ethanol yields from high–yielding crops. The process ethanol yield showed similar variability across years and feedstocks. A low process yield for corn stover was determined to result from inhibition of xylose utilization by unusually elevated levels of hydroxycinnamates (p–coumaric and ferulic acids) in the untreated biomass and their acid and amide derivatives in the resulting hydrolyzate. This finding highlights the need to better understand factors that influence process ethanol yield and biomass quality. Ultimately we provide evidence that most feedstocks fall within a similar range of process ethanol yield, particularly for the more resistant strain Z. mobilis8b. Furthermore, this supports the claim that the refinery can successfully diversify its feedstock supply, enabling many social and environmental benefits that can accrue due to landscape diversification.},
doi = {10.1111/gcbb.12533},
journal = {Global Change Biology. Bioenergy},
number = 11,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {7}
}

Works referenced in this record:

Lignin valorization through integrated biological funneling and chemical catalysis
journal, August 2014
  • Linger, J. G.; Vardon, D. R.; Guarnieri, M. T.
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, Issue 33, p. 12013-12018
  • DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1410657111