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Title: Effects of CO 2 and H 2S on Corrosion of Martensitic Steels in Brines at Low Temperature

Abstract

Corrosion studies were conducted for martensitic carbon steels in 5 wt% NaCl brine solutions at 4°C and 10 MPa (1,450 psi). These studies simulated different subsurface environments relevant to Arctic drilling. Here, two high-strength martensitic carbon steels, S-135 and UD-165, were studied in three different environments: (1) a CO 2-NaCl-H 2O solution with a CO 2:H 2O molar ratio of 0.312 in the whole system, (2) an H 2S-NaCl-H 2O solution with an H 2S:H 2O molar ratio of 3.12 × 10 –4, and (3) a CO 2-H 2S-NaCl-H 2O solution with the same acid gas to water ratios as environments 1 and 2. Results from the CO 2+H 2S mixed environment indicated that sour corrosion mechanism was dominant when the CO 2:H 2S molar ratio was 1,000. This impact of a small amount of H 2S on the corrosion mechanism could be attributed to the specific adsorption of H 2S on the steel surface. Electrochemical and mass loss measurements showed a distinct drop in the corrosion rate (CR) by more than one order of magnitude when transitioning from sweet to sour corrosion. This inhibiting effect on CR was attributed to the formation of a protective sulfide thin film. Tafelmore » analyses of the anodic reaction showed that the Bockris mechanism was unlikely in the conditions tested. As a result, when comparisons were made between modeled and experimental CRs, good agreement was found in the CO 2-only and H 2S-only environments, but not in the CO 2+H 2S environment.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [2]
  1. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)
  2. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)
  3. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1461642
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Corrosion
Additional Journal Information:
[ Journal Volume: 74; Journal Issue: 3]; Journal ID: ISSN 0010-9312
Publisher:
NACE International
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; cold-climate corrosion; corrosion mechanism; corrosion rate; martensitic carbon steels; sweet and sour corrosion

Citation Formats

Feng, Ruishu, Beck, Justin R., Hall, Derek M., Buyuksagis, Aysel, Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret, and Lvov, Serguei N. Effects of CO2 and H2S on Corrosion of Martensitic Steels in Brines at Low Temperature. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.5006/2406.
Feng, Ruishu, Beck, Justin R., Hall, Derek M., Buyuksagis, Aysel, Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret, & Lvov, Serguei N. Effects of CO2 and H2S on Corrosion of Martensitic Steels in Brines at Low Temperature. United States. doi:10.5006/2406.
Feng, Ruishu, Beck, Justin R., Hall, Derek M., Buyuksagis, Aysel, Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret, and Lvov, Serguei N. Thu . "Effects of CO2 and H2S on Corrosion of Martensitic Steels in Brines at Low Temperature". United States. doi:10.5006/2406. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1461642.
@article{osti_1461642,
title = {Effects of CO2 and H2S on Corrosion of Martensitic Steels in Brines at Low Temperature},
author = {Feng, Ruishu and Beck, Justin R. and Hall, Derek M. and Buyuksagis, Aysel and Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret and Lvov, Serguei N.},
abstractNote = {Corrosion studies were conducted for martensitic carbon steels in 5 wt% NaCl brine solutions at 4°C and 10 MPa (1,450 psi). These studies simulated different subsurface environments relevant to Arctic drilling. Here, two high-strength martensitic carbon steels, S-135 and UD-165, were studied in three different environments: (1) a CO2-NaCl-H2O solution with a CO2:H2O molar ratio of 0.312 in the whole system, (2) an H2S-NaCl-H2O solution with an H2S:H2O molar ratio of 3.12 × 10–4, and (3) a CO2-H2S-NaCl-H2O solution with the same acid gas to water ratios as environments 1 and 2. Results from the CO2+H2S mixed environment indicated that sour corrosion mechanism was dominant when the CO2:H2S molar ratio was 1,000. This impact of a small amount of H2S on the corrosion mechanism could be attributed to the specific adsorption of H2S on the steel surface. Electrochemical and mass loss measurements showed a distinct drop in the corrosion rate (CR) by more than one order of magnitude when transitioning from sweet to sour corrosion. This inhibiting effect on CR was attributed to the formation of a protective sulfide thin film. Tafel analyses of the anodic reaction showed that the Bockris mechanism was unlikely in the conditions tested. As a result, when comparisons were made between modeled and experimental CRs, good agreement was found in the CO2-only and H2S-only environments, but not in the CO2+H2S environment.},
doi = {10.5006/2406},
journal = {Corrosion},
number = [3],
volume = [74],
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {10}
}

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