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Title: Creating metamaterial building blocks with directed photochemical metallization of silver onto DNA origami templates

Here, DNA origami can be used to create a variety of complex and geometrically unique nanostructures that can be further modified to produce building blocks for applications such as in optical metamaterials. We describe a method for creating metal-coated nanostructures using DNA origami templates and a photochemical metallization technique. Triangular DNA origami forms were fabricated and coated with a thin metal layer by photochemical silver reduction while in solution or supported on a surface. The DNA origami template serves as a localized photosensitizer to facilitate reduction of silver ions directly from solution onto the DNA surface. The metallizing process is shown to result in a conformal metal coating, which grows in height to a self-limiting value with increasing photoreduction steps. Although this coating process results in a slight decrease in the triangle dimensions, the overall template shape is retained. Notably, this coating method exhibits characteristics of self-limiting and defect-filling growth, which results in a metal nanostructure that maps the shape of the original DNA template with a continuous and uniform metal layer and stops growing once all available DNA sites are exhausted.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Ames Lab. and Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
IS-J-9702
Journal ID: ISSN 0957-4484
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11358
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nanotechnology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 29; Journal Issue: 35; Journal ID: ISSN 0957-4484
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Research Org:
Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; DNA; origami; metal nanostructures; metamaterials; photochemical; silver
OSTI Identifier:
1460379

Hossen, Md Mir, Bendickson, Lee, Palo, Pierre E., Yao, Zhiqi, Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit, and Hillier, Andrew C.. Creating metamaterial building blocks with directed photochemical metallization of silver onto DNA origami templates. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1088/1361-6528/aacb16.
Hossen, Md Mir, Bendickson, Lee, Palo, Pierre E., Yao, Zhiqi, Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit, & Hillier, Andrew C.. Creating metamaterial building blocks with directed photochemical metallization of silver onto DNA origami templates. United States. doi:10.1088/1361-6528/aacb16.
Hossen, Md Mir, Bendickson, Lee, Palo, Pierre E., Yao, Zhiqi, Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit, and Hillier, Andrew C.. 2018. "Creating metamaterial building blocks with directed photochemical metallization of silver onto DNA origami templates". United States. doi:10.1088/1361-6528/aacb16.
@article{osti_1460379,
title = {Creating metamaterial building blocks with directed photochemical metallization of silver onto DNA origami templates},
author = {Hossen, Md Mir and Bendickson, Lee and Palo, Pierre E. and Yao, Zhiqi and Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit and Hillier, Andrew C.},
abstractNote = {Here, DNA origami can be used to create a variety of complex and geometrically unique nanostructures that can be further modified to produce building blocks for applications such as in optical metamaterials. We describe a method for creating metal-coated nanostructures using DNA origami templates and a photochemical metallization technique. Triangular DNA origami forms were fabricated and coated with a thin metal layer by photochemical silver reduction while in solution or supported on a surface. The DNA origami template serves as a localized photosensitizer to facilitate reduction of silver ions directly from solution onto the DNA surface. The metallizing process is shown to result in a conformal metal coating, which grows in height to a self-limiting value with increasing photoreduction steps. Although this coating process results in a slight decrease in the triangle dimensions, the overall template shape is retained. Notably, this coating method exhibits characteristics of self-limiting and defect-filling growth, which results in a metal nanostructure that maps the shape of the original DNA template with a continuous and uniform metal layer and stops growing once all available DNA sites are exhausted.},
doi = {10.1088/1361-6528/aacb16},
journal = {Nanotechnology},
number = 35,
volume = 29,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {6}
}