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Title: Application of the Aquifer Impact Model to support decisions at a CO 2 sequestration site

Abstract

The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) has developed a suite of tools to assess and manage risk at CO 2 sequestration sites. The NRAP tool suite includes the Aquifer Impact Model (AIM), which evaluates the potential for groundwater impacts from leaks of CO 2 and brine through abandoned wellbores. There are two aquifer reduced-order models (ROMs) included with the AIM tool, a confined alluvium aquifer, and an unconfined carbonate aquifer. The models accept aquifer parameters as a range of variable inputs so they may have broad applicability. The generic aquifer models may be used at the early stages of site selection, when site-specific data is not available. Guidelines have been developed for determining when the generic ROMs might be applicable to a new site. This work considers the application of the AIM to predicting the impact of CO 2 or brine leakage were it to occur at the Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP). Results of the model sensitivity analysis can help guide characterization efforts; the hydraulic parameters and leakage source term magnitude are more sensitive than clay fraction or cation exchange capacity. Sand permeability was the only hydraulic parameter measured at the IBDP site. More information on the other hydraulicmore » parameters could reduce uncertainty in risk estimates. Some non-adjustable parameters are significantly different for the ROM than for the observations at the IBDP site. The generic ROMs could be made more useful to a wider range of sites if the initial conditions and no-impact threshold values were adjustable parameters.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [4];  [2];  [4];  [2]; ORCiD logo [5];  [6];  [2]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  2. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS)
  3. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  4. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  5. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  6. University of Illinois, Illinois State Geological Survey Champaign IL USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, Morgantown, WV (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE); USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1458630
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1396417; OSTI ID: 1461397; OSTI ID: 1563942
Report Number(s):
[LLNL-JRNL-738821; PNNL‐SA-‐124662; PNNL-17-60716; LA-UR-17-28174]
[Journal ID: ISSN 2152-3878; 890919]
Grant/Contract Number:  
[AC52-07NA27344; FC26‐05NT42588; AC05-76RL01830; AC52-06NA25396; AC02-05CH11231]
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
[ Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 6]; Journal ID: ISSN 2152-3878
Publisher:
Society of Chemical Industry, Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; carbon sequestration; risk analysis; groundwater; brine; carbon dioxide; leakage; Earth Sciences

Citation Formats

Bacon, Diana Holford, Locke II, Randall A., Keating, Elizabeth, Carroll, Susan, Iranmanesh, Abbas, Mansoor, Kayyum, Wimmer, Bracken, Zheng, Liange, Shao, Hongbo, and Greenberg, Sallie E. Application of the Aquifer Impact Model to support decisions at a CO2 sequestration site. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/ghg.1730.
Bacon, Diana Holford, Locke II, Randall A., Keating, Elizabeth, Carroll, Susan, Iranmanesh, Abbas, Mansoor, Kayyum, Wimmer, Bracken, Zheng, Liange, Shao, Hongbo, & Greenberg, Sallie E. Application of the Aquifer Impact Model to support decisions at a CO2 sequestration site. United States. doi:10.1002/ghg.1730.
Bacon, Diana Holford, Locke II, Randall A., Keating, Elizabeth, Carroll, Susan, Iranmanesh, Abbas, Mansoor, Kayyum, Wimmer, Bracken, Zheng, Liange, Shao, Hongbo, and Greenberg, Sallie E. Wed . "Application of the Aquifer Impact Model to support decisions at a CO2 sequestration site". United States. doi:10.1002/ghg.1730. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1458630.
@article{osti_1458630,
title = {Application of the Aquifer Impact Model to support decisions at a CO2 sequestration site},
author = {Bacon, Diana Holford and Locke II, Randall A. and Keating, Elizabeth and Carroll, Susan and Iranmanesh, Abbas and Mansoor, Kayyum and Wimmer, Bracken and Zheng, Liange and Shao, Hongbo and Greenberg, Sallie E.},
abstractNote = {The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) has developed a suite of tools to assess and manage risk at CO2 sequestration sites. The NRAP tool suite includes the Aquifer Impact Model (AIM), which evaluates the potential for groundwater impacts from leaks of CO2 and brine through abandoned wellbores. There are two aquifer reduced-order models (ROMs) included with the AIM tool, a confined alluvium aquifer, and an unconfined carbonate aquifer. The models accept aquifer parameters as a range of variable inputs so they may have broad applicability. The generic aquifer models may be used at the early stages of site selection, when site-specific data is not available. Guidelines have been developed for determining when the generic ROMs might be applicable to a new site. This work considers the application of the AIM to predicting the impact of CO2 or brine leakage were it to occur at the Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP). Results of the model sensitivity analysis can help guide characterization efforts; the hydraulic parameters and leakage source term magnitude are more sensitive than clay fraction or cation exchange capacity. Sand permeability was the only hydraulic parameter measured at the IBDP site. More information on the other hydraulic parameters could reduce uncertainty in risk estimates. Some non-adjustable parameters are significantly different for the ROM than for the observations at the IBDP site. The generic ROMs could be made more useful to a wider range of sites if the initial conditions and no-impact threshold values were adjustable parameters.},
doi = {10.1002/ghg.1730},
journal = {Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology},
number = [6],
volume = [7],
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {10}
}

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