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Title: Techno-economic analysis of high-efficiency natural-gas generators for residential combined heat and power

Abstract

Residential combined heat and power (CHP) systems produce electricity onsite while utilizing waste heat to supplement home heating requirements, which can lead to significant reductions in CO2 emissions and primary energy consumption. However, the current deployment of such CHP systems in the U.S. residential sector is extremely low primarily due to their high cost, short system life, and low system efficiency. Based on an analysis of average energy consumption of representative single-family homes in 10 U.S. cities across 7 different climate zones, it is concluded that there is no one-size-fits-all residential CHP system, but that a range of products are more likely to reflect consumer preferences. It is further identified via a systematic techno-economic analysis (TEA) that high-efficiency (e.g., 30% - 40% fuel to electricity), long-life (e.g., 15 years), low-cost (preferably less than U.S. $2,500 installed price), and low emissions are key requirements to enable widespread deployment of CHP systems in the U.S. residential sector. This article analyzes how the payback period would change for each city by varying nearly a dozen parameters and concludes with an evaluation on maximum market penetration based on a given set of parameters, and the resulting energy and emissions savings that can be practicallymore » achieved in some scenarios.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Booz Allen Hamilton, Washington, DC (United States)
  2. Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E); The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E)
OSTI Identifier:
1458448
Grant/Contract Number:  
AR0000154; 89703018CAR000001
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Energy
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 226; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2018.06.013; Journal ID: ISSN 0306-2619
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; 42 ENGINEERING; Combined heat and power (CHP), Natural gas generators, Energy efficiency, Engines, Turbines, GENSETS, MicroCHP, Microcogeneration

Citation Formats

Vishwanathan, Gokul, Sculley, Julian P., Fischer, Adam, and Zhao, Ji-Cheng. Techno-economic analysis of high-efficiency natural-gas generators for residential combined heat and power. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2018.06.013.
Vishwanathan, Gokul, Sculley, Julian P., Fischer, Adam, & Zhao, Ji-Cheng. Techno-economic analysis of high-efficiency natural-gas generators for residential combined heat and power. United States. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2018.06.013.
Vishwanathan, Gokul, Sculley, Julian P., Fischer, Adam, and Zhao, Ji-Cheng. Fri . "Techno-economic analysis of high-efficiency natural-gas generators for residential combined heat and power". United States. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2018.06.013. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1458448.
@article{osti_1458448,
title = {Techno-economic analysis of high-efficiency natural-gas generators for residential combined heat and power},
author = {Vishwanathan, Gokul and Sculley, Julian P. and Fischer, Adam and Zhao, Ji-Cheng},
abstractNote = {Residential combined heat and power (CHP) systems produce electricity onsite while utilizing waste heat to supplement home heating requirements, which can lead to significant reductions in CO2 emissions and primary energy consumption. However, the current deployment of such CHP systems in the U.S. residential sector is extremely low primarily due to their high cost, short system life, and low system efficiency. Based on an analysis of average energy consumption of representative single-family homes in 10 U.S. cities across 7 different climate zones, it is concluded that there is no one-size-fits-all residential CHP system, but that a range of products are more likely to reflect consumer preferences. It is further identified via a systematic techno-economic analysis (TEA) that high-efficiency (e.g., 30% - 40% fuel to electricity), long-life (e.g., 15 years), low-cost (preferably less than U.S. $2,500 installed price), and low emissions are key requirements to enable widespread deployment of CHP systems in the U.S. residential sector. This article analyzes how the payback period would change for each city by varying nearly a dozen parameters and concludes with an evaluation on maximum market penetration based on a given set of parameters, and the resulting energy and emissions savings that can be practically achieved in some scenarios.},
doi = {10.1016/j.apenergy.2018.06.013},
journal = {Applied Energy},
number = C,
volume = 226,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {6}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Cited by: 3 works
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Figures / Tables:

Fig. 1 Fig. 1: Building America Climate Zones and cities chosen for this study. Green (red) stars indicate conditions where deployment of CHP is (un)favorable given the conditions listed in Scenario 1 in Table 1.

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