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Title: Leaf phenology as one important driver of seasonal changes in isoprene emission in central Amazonia

Abstract

Isoprene fluxes vary seasonally with changes in environmental factors (e.g., solar radiation and temperature) and biological factors (e.g., leaf phenology). However, our understanding of seasonal patterns of isoprene fluxes and associated mechanistic controls are still limited, especially in Amazonian evergreen forests. Here in this article, we aim to connect intensive, field-based measurements of canopy isoprene flux over a central Amazonian evergreen forest with meteorological observations and with tower-camera leaf phenology to improve understanding of patterns and causes of isoprene flux seasonality. Our results demonstrate that the highest isoprene emissions are observed during the dry and dry-to-wet transition seasons, whereas the lowest emissions were found during the wet-to-dry transition season. Our results also indicate that light and temperature can not totally explain the isoprene flux seasonality. Instead, the camera-derived leaf area index (LAI) of recently mature leaf-age class (e.g. leaf ages of 3–5 months) exhibits the highest correlation with observed isoprene flux seasonality (R2=0.59, p<0.05). Attempting to better represent leaf phenology in the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN 2.1), we improved the leaf age algorithm utilizing results from the camera-derived leaf phenology that provided LAI categorized in three different leaf ages. The model results show thatmore » the observations of age-dependent isoprene emission capacity, in conjunction with camera-derived leaf age demography, significantly improved simulations in terms of seasonal variations of isoprene fluxes (R2=0.52, p<0.05). This study highlights the importance of accounting for differences in isoprene emission capacity across canopy leaf age classes and of identifying forest adaptive mechanisms that underlie seasonal variation of isoprene emissions in Amazonia.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [2]; ORCiD logo [6];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [7]; ORCiD logo [4];  [8];  [9]; ORCiD logo [10];  [11];  [12]
  1. National Inst. for Amazonian Research (INPA), Manaus (Brazil). Dept. of Environmental Dynamics
  2. Federal Univ. of West Para (UFOPA) Santarem (Brazil). Inst. of Engineering and Geoscience
  3. 2B Technologies, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)
  4. Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Earth System Science
  5. National Inst. for Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN), Sao Paulo (Brazil)
  6. Federal Univ. of Para, Belem, PA (Brazil). Dept. of Meteorology, Geosciences Inst.
  7. State Univ. of Amazonas (UEA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Meteorology Dept.
  8. Royal Belgian Inst. for Space Aeronomy, Brussels (Belgium)
  9. Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Mexico City (Mexico). Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera
  10. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Environmental and Climate Sciences
  11. Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Dept.
  12. National Inst. for Spatial Research, Cachoeira Paulista, SP (Brazil)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
OSTI Identifier:
1457345
Report Number(s):
BNL-205804-2018-JAAM
Journal ID: ISSN 1810-6285
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0012704
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Biogeosciences Discussions (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Biogeosciences Discussions (Online); Journal Volume: 15; Journal Issue: 13; Journal ID: ISSN 1810-6285
Publisher:
European Geosciences Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Alves, Eliane G., Tota, Julio, Turnipseed, Andrew, Guenther, Alex B., Vega Bustillos, Jose Oscar W., Santana, Raoni A., Cirino, Glauber G., Tavares, Julia V., Lopes, Aline, Nelson, Bruce W., de Souza, Rodrigo A., Gu, Dasa, Stavrakou, Trissevgeni, Adams, David K., Wu, Jin, Saleska, Scott, and Manzi, Antonio O. Leaf phenology as one important driver of seasonal changes in isoprene emission in central Amazonia. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.5194/bg-2018-26.
Alves, Eliane G., Tota, Julio, Turnipseed, Andrew, Guenther, Alex B., Vega Bustillos, Jose Oscar W., Santana, Raoni A., Cirino, Glauber G., Tavares, Julia V., Lopes, Aline, Nelson, Bruce W., de Souza, Rodrigo A., Gu, Dasa, Stavrakou, Trissevgeni, Adams, David K., Wu, Jin, Saleska, Scott, & Manzi, Antonio O. Leaf phenology as one important driver of seasonal changes in isoprene emission in central Amazonia. United States. https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2018-26
Alves, Eliane G., Tota, Julio, Turnipseed, Andrew, Guenther, Alex B., Vega Bustillos, Jose Oscar W., Santana, Raoni A., Cirino, Glauber G., Tavares, Julia V., Lopes, Aline, Nelson, Bruce W., de Souza, Rodrigo A., Gu, Dasa, Stavrakou, Trissevgeni, Adams, David K., Wu, Jin, Saleska, Scott, and Manzi, Antonio O. Tue . "Leaf phenology as one important driver of seasonal changes in isoprene emission in central Amazonia". United States. https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2018-26. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1457345.
@article{osti_1457345,
title = {Leaf phenology as one important driver of seasonal changes in isoprene emission in central Amazonia},
author = {Alves, Eliane G. and Tota, Julio and Turnipseed, Andrew and Guenther, Alex B. and Vega Bustillos, Jose Oscar W. and Santana, Raoni A. and Cirino, Glauber G. and Tavares, Julia V. and Lopes, Aline and Nelson, Bruce W. and de Souza, Rodrigo A. and Gu, Dasa and Stavrakou, Trissevgeni and Adams, David K. and Wu, Jin and Saleska, Scott and Manzi, Antonio O.},
abstractNote = {Isoprene fluxes vary seasonally with changes in environmental factors (e.g., solar radiation and temperature) and biological factors (e.g., leaf phenology). However, our understanding of seasonal patterns of isoprene fluxes and associated mechanistic controls are still limited, especially in Amazonian evergreen forests. Here in this article, we aim to connect intensive, field-based measurements of canopy isoprene flux over a central Amazonian evergreen forest with meteorological observations and with tower-camera leaf phenology to improve understanding of patterns and causes of isoprene flux seasonality. Our results demonstrate that the highest isoprene emissions are observed during the dry and dry-to-wet transition seasons, whereas the lowest emissions were found during the wet-to-dry transition season. Our results also indicate that light and temperature can not totally explain the isoprene flux seasonality. Instead, the camera-derived leaf area index (LAI) of recently mature leaf-age class (e.g. leaf ages of 3–5 months) exhibits the highest correlation with observed isoprene flux seasonality (R2=0.59, p<0.05). Attempting to better represent leaf phenology in the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN 2.1), we improved the leaf age algorithm utilizing results from the camera-derived leaf phenology that provided LAI categorized in three different leaf ages. The model results show that the observations of age-dependent isoprene emission capacity, in conjunction with camera-derived leaf age demography, significantly improved simulations in terms of seasonal variations of isoprene fluxes (R2=0.52, p<0.05). This study highlights the importance of accounting for differences in isoprene emission capacity across canopy leaf age classes and of identifying forest adaptive mechanisms that underlie seasonal variation of isoprene emissions in Amazonia.},
doi = {10.5194/bg-2018-26},
journal = {Biogeosciences Discussions (Online)},
number = 13,
volume = 15,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Figures / Tables:

Table 1 Table 1: Environmental and biological factors used to input the MEGAN 2.1: number of days with data available for each variable for the year 2013

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Works referencing / citing this record:

Is There a Classical Inertial Sublayer Over the Amazon Forest?
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Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.