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Title: iPTF 16asu: A Luminous, Rapidly Evolving, and High-velocity Supernova

Wide-field surveys are discovering a growing number of rare transients whose physical origin is not yet well understood. We present optical and UV data and analysis of intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) 16asu, a luminous, rapidly evolving, high-velocity, stripped-envelope supernova (SN). With a rest-frame rise time of just four days and a peak absolute magnitude of M g = -20.4 mag, the light curve of iPTF 16asu is faster and more luminous than that of previous rapid transients. The spectra of iPTF 16asu show a featureless blue continuum near peak that develops into an SN Ic-BL spectrum on the decline. We show that while the late-time light curve could plausibly be powered by 56Ni decay, the early emission requires a different energy source. Nondetections in the X-ray and radio strongly constrain the energy coupled to relativistic ejecta to be at most comparable to the class of low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We suggest that the early emission may have been powered by either a rapidly spinning-down magnetar or by shock breakout in an extended envelope of a very energetic explosion. In either scenario a central engine is required, making iPTF 16asu an intriguing transition object between superluminous SNe, SNe Ic-BL, andmore » low-luminosity GRBs.« less
Authors:
 [1] ; ORCiD logo [2] ; ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [3] ; ORCiD logo [4] ; ORCiD logo [5] ; ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [6] ; ORCiD logo [7] ; ORCiD logo [8] ; ORCiD logo [9] ; ORCiD logo [8] ; ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [10] ; ORCiD logo [11] ; ORCiD logo [12] ;  [13] ; ORCiD logo [14] more »; ORCiD logo [15] ; ORCiD logo [8] ; ORCiD logo [7] ;  [8] ; ORCiD logo [14] ;  [16] « less
  1. California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Astronomy
  2. California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Astronomy; Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Oskar Klein Centre and Dept. of Astronomy
  3. Liverpool John Moores Univ., Liverpool (United Kingdom). Astrophysics Research Inst.
  4. Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
  5. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States). Astrophysics Science Division; Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Joint Space-Science Inst.
  6. California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.
  7. Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), St. Petersburg (Russian Federation). Ioffe Physical Technical Inst.
  8. Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Oskar Klein Centre and Dept. of Astronomy
  9. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Space Sciences Lab.
  10. Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Dept. of Particle Physics and Astrophysics; Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark). The Niels Bohr Inst. and Dark Cosmology Centre
  11. California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Infrared Processing and Analysis Center
  12. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Astronomy
  13. Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Astrophysical Sciences
  14. Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Dept. of Particle Physics and Astrophysics
  15. Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland). Integral Science Data Centre (ISDC) and Dept. of Astronomy
  16. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231; 1545949; NNX16AN84G; 1455090; 17-12-01378
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: The Astrophysical Journal (Online); Journal Volume: 851; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1538-4357
Publisher:
Institute of Physics (IOP)
Research Org:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) (SC-21); National Science Foundation (NSF); National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA); Russian Science Foundation (RSF)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; supernovae; iPRF16asu; gamma-ray burst; magnetars; shock waves
OSTI Identifier:
1456987

Whitesides, L., Lunnan, R., Kasliwal, M. M., Perley, D. A., Corsi, A., Cenko, S. B., Blagorodnova, N., Cao, Y., Cook, D. O., Doran, G. B., Frederiks, D. D., Fremling, C., Hurley, K., Karamehmetoglu, E., Kulkarni, S. R., Leloudas, G., Masci, F., Nugent, P. E., Ritter, A., Rubin, A., Savchenko, V., Sollerman, J., Svinkin, D. S., Taddia, F., Vreeswijk, P., and Wozniak, P.. iPTF 16asu: A Luminous, Rapidly Evolving, and High-velocity Supernova. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa99de.
Whitesides, L., Lunnan, R., Kasliwal, M. M., Perley, D. A., Corsi, A., Cenko, S. B., Blagorodnova, N., Cao, Y., Cook, D. O., Doran, G. B., Frederiks, D. D., Fremling, C., Hurley, K., Karamehmetoglu, E., Kulkarni, S. R., Leloudas, G., Masci, F., Nugent, P. E., Ritter, A., Rubin, A., Savchenko, V., Sollerman, J., Svinkin, D. S., Taddia, F., Vreeswijk, P., & Wozniak, P.. iPTF 16asu: A Luminous, Rapidly Evolving, and High-velocity Supernova. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa99de.
Whitesides, L., Lunnan, R., Kasliwal, M. M., Perley, D. A., Corsi, A., Cenko, S. B., Blagorodnova, N., Cao, Y., Cook, D. O., Doran, G. B., Frederiks, D. D., Fremling, C., Hurley, K., Karamehmetoglu, E., Kulkarni, S. R., Leloudas, G., Masci, F., Nugent, P. E., Ritter, A., Rubin, A., Savchenko, V., Sollerman, J., Svinkin, D. S., Taddia, F., Vreeswijk, P., and Wozniak, P.. 2017. "iPTF 16asu: A Luminous, Rapidly Evolving, and High-velocity Supernova". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa99de. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1456987.
@article{osti_1456987,
title = {iPTF 16asu: A Luminous, Rapidly Evolving, and High-velocity Supernova},
author = {Whitesides, L. and Lunnan, R. and Kasliwal, M. M. and Perley, D. A. and Corsi, A. and Cenko, S. B. and Blagorodnova, N. and Cao, Y. and Cook, D. O. and Doran, G. B. and Frederiks, D. D. and Fremling, C. and Hurley, K. and Karamehmetoglu, E. and Kulkarni, S. R. and Leloudas, G. and Masci, F. and Nugent, P. E. and Ritter, A. and Rubin, A. and Savchenko, V. and Sollerman, J. and Svinkin, D. S. and Taddia, F. and Vreeswijk, P. and Wozniak, P.},
abstractNote = {Wide-field surveys are discovering a growing number of rare transients whose physical origin is not yet well understood. We present optical and UV data and analysis of intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) 16asu, a luminous, rapidly evolving, high-velocity, stripped-envelope supernova (SN). With a rest-frame rise time of just four days and a peak absolute magnitude of Mg = -20.4 mag, the light curve of iPTF 16asu is faster and more luminous than that of previous rapid transients. The spectra of iPTF 16asu show a featureless blue continuum near peak that develops into an SN Ic-BL spectrum on the decline. We show that while the late-time light curve could plausibly be powered by 56Ni decay, the early emission requires a different energy source. Nondetections in the X-ray and radio strongly constrain the energy coupled to relativistic ejecta to be at most comparable to the class of low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We suggest that the early emission may have been powered by either a rapidly spinning-down magnetar or by shock breakout in an extended envelope of a very energetic explosion. In either scenario a central engine is required, making iPTF 16asu an intriguing transition object between superluminous SNe, SNe Ic-BL, and low-luminosity GRBs.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/aa99de},
journal = {The Astrophysical Journal (Online)},
number = 2,
volume = 851,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}