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This content will become publicly available on January 8, 2019

Title: Engineered Transport in Microporous Materials and Membranes for Clean Energy Technologies

Many forward-looking clean-energy technologies hinge on the development of scalable and efficient membrane-based separations. Ongoing investment in the basic research of microporous materials is beginning to pay dividends in membrane technology maturation. Specifically, improvements in membrane selectivity, permeability, and durability are being leveraged for more efficient carbon capture, desalination, and energy storage, and the market adoption of membranes in those areas appears to be on the horizon. Herein, an overview of the microporous materials chemistry driving advanced membrane development, the clean-energy separations employing them, and the theoretical underpinnings tying membrane performance to membrane structure across multiple length scales is provided. The interplay of pore architecture and chemistry for a given set of analytes emerges as a critical design consideration dictating mass transport outcomes. Also discussed are opportunities and outstanding challenges in the field, including high-flux 2D molecular-sieving membranes, phase-change adsorbents as performance-enhancing components in composite membranes, and the need for quantitative metrologies for understanding mass transport in heterophasic materials and in micropores with unusual chemical interactions with analytes of interest.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [1] ;  [4] ;  [5] ; ORCiD logo [6]
  1. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
  2. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
  3. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering
  4. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division
  5. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division
  6. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division and Molecular Foundry
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231; SC0001015
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 30; Journal Issue: 8; Related Information: © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim; Journal ID: ISSN 0935-9648
Publisher:
Wiley
Research Org:
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Foundry; Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Center for Gas Separations Relevant to Clean Energy Technologies (CGS)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; chemical separations; energy conversion; energy storage; microporous materials; transport selectivity
OSTI Identifier:
1454496
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1416396