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Title: Decomposition by ectomycorrhizal fungi alters soil carbon storage in a simulation model

Abstract

Carbon cycle models often lack explicit belowground organism activity, yet belowground organisms regulate carbon storage and release in soil. Ectomycorrhizal fungi are important players in the carbon cycle because they are a conduit into soil for carbon assimilated by the plant. It is hypothesized that ectomycorrhizal fungi can also be active decomposers when plant carbon allocation to fungi is low. Here, we reviewed the literature on ectomycorrhizal decomposition and we developed a simulation model of the plant-mycorrhizae interaction where a reduction in plant productivity stimulates ectomycorrhizal fungi to decompose soil organic matter. Our review highlights evidence demonstrating the potential for ectomycorrhizal fungi to decompose soil organic matter. Our model output suggests that ectomycorrhizal activity accounts for a portion of carbon decomposed in soil, but this portion varied with plant productivity and the mycorrhizal carbon uptake strategy simulated. Lower organic matter inputs to soil were largely responsible for reduced soil carbon storage. Using mathematical theory, we demonstrated that biotic interactions affect predictions of ecosystem functions. Specifically, we developed a simple function to model the mycorrhizal switch in function from plant symbiont to decomposer. In conclusion, we show that including mycorrhizal fungi with the flexibility of mutualistic and saprotrophic lifestyles alters predictionsmore » of ecosystem function.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]
  1. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
  2. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, Knoxville, TN (United States)
  3. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23). Biological Systems Science Division
OSTI Identifier:
1439446
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0010562
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Ecosphere
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 2150-8925
Publisher:
Ecological Society of America
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; carbon cycle; decomposition; ectomycorrhizae; extracellular enzyme activity; plant-soil interactions; simulation model; soil carbon sequestration

Citation Formats

Moore, J. A. M., Jiang, J., Post, W. M., and Classen, A. T. Decomposition by ectomycorrhizal fungi alters soil carbon storage in a simulation model. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1890/ES14-00301.1.
Moore, J. A. M., Jiang, J., Post, W. M., & Classen, A. T. Decomposition by ectomycorrhizal fungi alters soil carbon storage in a simulation model. United States. doi:10.1890/ES14-00301.1.
Moore, J. A. M., Jiang, J., Post, W. M., and Classen, A. T. Fri . "Decomposition by ectomycorrhizal fungi alters soil carbon storage in a simulation model". United States. doi:10.1890/ES14-00301.1. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1439446.
@article{osti_1439446,
title = {Decomposition by ectomycorrhizal fungi alters soil carbon storage in a simulation model},
author = {Moore, J. A. M. and Jiang, J. and Post, W. M. and Classen, A. T.},
abstractNote = {Carbon cycle models often lack explicit belowground organism activity, yet belowground organisms regulate carbon storage and release in soil. Ectomycorrhizal fungi are important players in the carbon cycle because they are a conduit into soil for carbon assimilated by the plant. It is hypothesized that ectomycorrhizal fungi can also be active decomposers when plant carbon allocation to fungi is low. Here, we reviewed the literature on ectomycorrhizal decomposition and we developed a simulation model of the plant-mycorrhizae interaction where a reduction in plant productivity stimulates ectomycorrhizal fungi to decompose soil organic matter. Our review highlights evidence demonstrating the potential for ectomycorrhizal fungi to decompose soil organic matter. Our model output suggests that ectomycorrhizal activity accounts for a portion of carbon decomposed in soil, but this portion varied with plant productivity and the mycorrhizal carbon uptake strategy simulated. Lower organic matter inputs to soil were largely responsible for reduced soil carbon storage. Using mathematical theory, we demonstrated that biotic interactions affect predictions of ecosystem functions. Specifically, we developed a simple function to model the mycorrhizal switch in function from plant symbiont to decomposer. In conclusion, we show that including mycorrhizal fungi with the flexibility of mutualistic and saprotrophic lifestyles alters predictions of ecosystem function.},
doi = {10.1890/ES14-00301.1},
journal = {Ecosphere},
number = 3,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {3}
}

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Cited by: 8 works
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