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Title: Comment on “Characterizing the population of pulsars in the Galactic bulge with the Fermi large area telescope” [arXiv:1705.00009v1]

Abstract

Here, the $$\textit{Fermi}$$-LAT Collaboration recently presented a new catalog of gamma-ray sources located within the $$40^{\circ} \times 40^{\circ}$$ region around the Galactic Center~(Ajello et al. 2017) -- the Second Fermi Inner Galaxy (2FIG) catalog. Utilizing this catalog, they analyzed models for the spatial distribution and luminosity function of sources with a pulsar-like gamma-ray spectrum. Ajello et al. 2017 v1 also claimed to detect, in addition to a disk-like population of pulsar-like sources, an approximately 7$$\sigma$$ preference for an additional centrally concentrated population of pulsar-like sources, which they referred to as a "Galactic Bulge" population. Such a population would be of great interest, as it would support a pulsar interpretation of the gamma-ray excess that has long been observed in this region. In an effort to further explore the implications of this new source catalog, we attempted to reproduce the results presented by the $$\textit{Fermi}$$-LAT Collaboration, but failed to do so. Mimicking as closely as possible the analysis techniques undertaken in Ajello et al. 2017, we instead find that our likelihood analysis favors a very different spatial distribution and luminosity function for these sources. Most notably, our results do not exhibit a strong preference for a "Galactic Bulge" population of pulsars. Furthermore, we find that masking the regions immediately surrounding each of the 2FIG pulsar candidates does $$\textit{not}$$ significantly impact the spectrum or intensity of the Galactic Center gamma-ray excess. Although these results refute the claim of strong evidence for a centrally concentrated pulsar population presented in Ajello et al. 2017, they neither rule out nor provide support for the possibility that the Galactic Center excess is generated by a population of low-luminosity and currently largely unobserved pulsars.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [6]
  1. Univ. of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (The Netherlands)
  2. Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
  3. (United States)
  4. The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)
  5. Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States)
  6. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)
  7. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1439047
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1548454
Report Number(s):
MIT-CTP-4945; PUPT-2538; MCTP-17-20; FERMILAB-PUB-17-427-A; arXiv:1710.10266
Journal ID: ISSN 2212-6864; 1633363; TRN: US1900536
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-07CH11359; DE − SC00012567; DE − SC0013999
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physics of the Dark Universe
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 20; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 2212-6864
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; Galactic center; Dark matter; Millisecond pulsar; Gamma-ray astronomy

Citation Formats

Bartels, Richard, Hooper, Dan, Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL, Linden, Tim, Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth, Rodd, Nicholas L., Safdi, Benjamin R., and Slatyer, Tracy R. Comment on “Characterizing the population of pulsars in the Galactic bulge with the Fermi large area telescope” [arXiv:1705.00009v1]. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.dark.2018.04.004.
Bartels, Richard, Hooper, Dan, Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL, Linden, Tim, Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth, Rodd, Nicholas L., Safdi, Benjamin R., & Slatyer, Tracy R. Comment on “Characterizing the population of pulsars in the Galactic bulge with the Fermi large area telescope” [arXiv:1705.00009v1]. United States. doi:10.1016/j.dark.2018.04.004.
Bartels, Richard, Hooper, Dan, Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL, Linden, Tim, Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth, Rodd, Nicholas L., Safdi, Benjamin R., and Slatyer, Tracy R. Tue . "Comment on “Characterizing the population of pulsars in the Galactic bulge with the Fermi large area telescope” [arXiv:1705.00009v1]". United States. doi:10.1016/j.dark.2018.04.004. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1439047.
@article{osti_1439047,
title = {Comment on “Characterizing the population of pulsars in the Galactic bulge with the Fermi large area telescope” [arXiv:1705.00009v1]},
author = {Bartels, Richard and Hooper, Dan and Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL and Linden, Tim and Mishra-Sharma, Siddharth and Rodd, Nicholas L. and Safdi, Benjamin R. and Slatyer, Tracy R.},
abstractNote = {Here, the $\textit{Fermi}$-LAT Collaboration recently presented a new catalog of gamma-ray sources located within the $40^{\circ} \times 40^{\circ}$ region around the Galactic Center~(Ajello et al. 2017) -- the Second Fermi Inner Galaxy (2FIG) catalog. Utilizing this catalog, they analyzed models for the spatial distribution and luminosity function of sources with a pulsar-like gamma-ray spectrum. Ajello et al. 2017 v1 also claimed to detect, in addition to a disk-like population of pulsar-like sources, an approximately 7$\sigma$ preference for an additional centrally concentrated population of pulsar-like sources, which they referred to as a "Galactic Bulge" population. Such a population would be of great interest, as it would support a pulsar interpretation of the gamma-ray excess that has long been observed in this region. In an effort to further explore the implications of this new source catalog, we attempted to reproduce the results presented by the $\textit{Fermi}$-LAT Collaboration, but failed to do so. Mimicking as closely as possible the analysis techniques undertaken in Ajello et al. 2017, we instead find that our likelihood analysis favors a very different spatial distribution and luminosity function for these sources. Most notably, our results do not exhibit a strong preference for a "Galactic Bulge" population of pulsars. Furthermore, we find that masking the regions immediately surrounding each of the 2FIG pulsar candidates does $\textit{not}$ significantly impact the spectrum or intensity of the Galactic Center gamma-ray excess. Although these results refute the claim of strong evidence for a centrally concentrated pulsar population presented in Ajello et al. 2017, they neither rule out nor provide support for the possibility that the Galactic Center excess is generated by a population of low-luminosity and currently largely unobserved pulsars.},
doi = {10.1016/j.dark.2018.04.004},
journal = {Physics of the Dark Universe},
number = C,
volume = 20,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}

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Figures / Tables:

Table 1 Table 1: The best-fit values and 1$σ$ uncertainty for the number of disk pulsars, ND , the scale-height of the disk population, $z$0, the index of the luminosity function, $β$, the number of bulge pulsars, NB , and the slope of the bulge population’s inner profile, α. Also listed ismore » the value of the test statistic (TS) with respect to the disk-only hypothesis (first row). In the second and third rows, results are shown with the inclusion of a bulge-like component, fixing the profile of that component to α = 2.6 or letting α float, respectively. All of the results shown here have utilized the “official” interstellar emission model (as presented by Ajello et al. (2017)) and were calculated using 3.3° spatial bins. The results of this study (bottom) vary substantially in almost every respect from those found by Ajello et al. (2017) (top).« less

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Works referencing / citing this record:

Bayesian model comparison and analysis of the Galactic disc population of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars
journal, September 2018

  • Bartels, R. T.; Edwards, T. D. P.; Weniger, C.
  • Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Vol. 481, Issue 3
  • DOI: 10.1093/mnras/sty2529

    Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.