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Title: Effect of vertical canopy architecture on transpiration, thermoregulation and carbon assimilation

Quantifying the impact of natural and anthropogenic disturbances such as deforestation, forest fires and vegetation thinning among others on net ecosystem—atmosphere exchanges of carbon dioxide, water vapor and heat—is an important aspect in the context of modeling global carbon, water and energy cycles. The absence of canopy architectural variation in horizontal and vertical directions is a major source of uncertainty in current climate models attempting to address these issues. This work demonstrates the importance of considering the vertical distribution of foliage density by coupling a leaf level plant biophysics model with analytical solutions of wind flow and light attenuation in a horizontally homogeneous canopy. It is demonstrated that plant physiological response in terms of carbon assimilation, transpiration and canopy surface temperature can be widely different for two canopies with the same leaf area index (LAI) but different leaf area density distributions, under several conditions of wind speed, light availability, soil moisture availability and atmospheric evaporative demand.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-29137
Journal ID: 1999-4907 (Electronic)
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Forests
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 4
Research Org:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Earth Sciences; canopy turbulence; transpiration; carbon assimilation; thermoregulation
OSTI Identifier:
1438360