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Title: Magnetotransport in a Model of a Disordered Strange Metal

Abstract

Despite much theoretical effort, there is no complete theory of the “strange” metal state of the high temperature superconductors, and its linear-in-temperature T resistivity. Recent experiments showing an unexpected linear-in-field B magnetoresistivity have deepened the puzzle. We propose a simple model of itinerant electrons, interacting via random couplings, with electrons localized on a lattice of “quantum dots” or “islands.” This model is solvable in a particular large- N limit and can reproduce observed behavior. The key feature of our model is that the electrons in each quantum dot are described by a Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model describing electrons without quasiparticle excitations. For a particular choice of the interaction between the itinerant and localized electrons, this model realizes a controlled description of a diffusive marginal-Fermi liquid (MFL) without momentum conservation, which has a linear-in- T resistivity and a T ln T specific heat as T → 0 . By tuning the strength of this interaction relative to the bandwidth of the itinerant electrons, we can additionally obtain a finite- T crossover to a fully incoherent regime that also has a linear-in- T resistivity. We describe the magnetotransport properties of this model and show that the MFL regime has conductivities that scale as amore » function of B/ T; however, the magnetoresistance saturates at large B. We then consider a macroscopically disordered sample with domains of such MFLs with varying densities of electrons and islands. Using an effective-medium approximation, we obtain a macroscopic electrical resistance that scales linearly in the magnetic field B applied perpendicular to the plane of the sample, at large B. Here, the resistance also scales linearly in T at small B, and as Tf (B/ T) at intermediate B. We consider implications for recent experiments reporting linear transverse magnetoresistance in the strange metal phases of the pnictides and cuprates.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)
  2. Univ. of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)
  3. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1438292
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1499002
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0009919
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Physical Review. X
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 2160-3308
Publisher:
American Physical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY

Citation Formats

Patel, Aavishkar A., McGreevy, John, Arovas, Daniel P., and Sachdev, Subir. Magnetotransport in a Model of a Disordered Strange Metal. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1103/physrevx.8.021049.
Patel, Aavishkar A., McGreevy, John, Arovas, Daniel P., & Sachdev, Subir. Magnetotransport in a Model of a Disordered Strange Metal. United States. doi:10.1103/physrevx.8.021049.
Patel, Aavishkar A., McGreevy, John, Arovas, Daniel P., and Sachdev, Subir. Tue . "Magnetotransport in a Model of a Disordered Strange Metal". United States. doi:10.1103/physrevx.8.021049.
@article{osti_1438292,
title = {Magnetotransport in a Model of a Disordered Strange Metal},
author = {Patel, Aavishkar A. and McGreevy, John and Arovas, Daniel P. and Sachdev, Subir},
abstractNote = {Despite much theoretical effort, there is no complete theory of the “strange” metal state of the high temperature superconductors, and its linear-in-temperature T resistivity. Recent experiments showing an unexpected linear-in-field B magnetoresistivity have deepened the puzzle. We propose a simple model of itinerant electrons, interacting via random couplings, with electrons localized on a lattice of “quantum dots” or “islands.” This model is solvable in a particular large-N limit and can reproduce observed behavior. The key feature of our model is that the electrons in each quantum dot are described by a Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model describing electrons without quasiparticle excitations. For a particular choice of the interaction between the itinerant and localized electrons, this model realizes a controlled description of a diffusive marginal-Fermi liquid (MFL) without momentum conservation, which has a linear-in-T resistivity and a T ln T specific heat as T → 0 . By tuning the strength of this interaction relative to the bandwidth of the itinerant electrons, we can additionally obtain a finite-T crossover to a fully incoherent regime that also has a linear-in- T resistivity. We describe the magnetotransport properties of this model and show that the MFL regime has conductivities that scale as a function of B/T; however, the magnetoresistance saturates at large B. We then consider a macroscopically disordered sample with domains of such MFLs with varying densities of electrons and islands. Using an effective-medium approximation, we obtain a macroscopic electrical resistance that scales linearly in the magnetic field B applied perpendicular to the plane of the sample, at large B. Here, the resistance also scales linearly in T at small B, and as Tf (B/T) at intermediate B. We consider implications for recent experiments reporting linear transverse magnetoresistance in the strange metal phases of the pnictides and cuprates.},
doi = {10.1103/physrevx.8.021049},
journal = {Physical Review. X},
number = 2,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {5}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1103/physrevx.8.021049

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