skip to main content

DOE PAGESDOE PAGES

Title: Retrospective Imaging and Characterization of Nuclear Material

Modern techniques for detection of covert nuclear ma-terial requires some combination of real time measurement and/or sampling of the material. More common is real time measure-ment of the ionizing emission caused by radioactive decay or through the materials measured in response to external interroga-tion radiation. One can expose the suspect material with various radiation types, including high energy photons such as x rays or with larger particles such as neutrons and muons, to obtain images or measure nuclear reactions induced in the material. Stand-off detection using imaging modalities similar to those in the medical field can be accomplished, or simple collimated detec-tors can be used to localize radioactive materials. In all such cases, the common feature is that some or all of the nuclear materials have to be present for the measurement, which makes sense; as one might ask, “How you can measure something that is not there?” The current work and results show how to do exactly that: characterize nuclear materials after they have been removed from an area leaving no chemical trace. This new approach is demon-strated to be fully capable of providing both previous source spa-tial distribution and emission energy grouping. The technique uses magnetic resonance formore » organic insulators and/or lumines-cence techniques on ubiquitous refractory materials similar in theory to the way the nuclear industry carries out worker person-nel dosimetry. Spatial information is obtained by acquiring gridded samples for dosimetric measurements, while energy infor-mation comes through dose depth profile results that are func-tions of the incident radiation energies.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2]
  1. North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)
  2. Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
NA0002576
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Health Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 113; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0017-9078
Publisher:
Health Physics Society
Research Org:
North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of Nonproliferation and Verification Research and Development (NA-22)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
OSTI Identifier:
1438211

Hayes, Robert B., and Sholom, Sergey. Retrospective Imaging and Characterization of Nuclear Material. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1097/HP.0000000000000680.
Hayes, Robert B., & Sholom, Sergey. Retrospective Imaging and Characterization of Nuclear Material. United States. doi:10.1097/HP.0000000000000680.
Hayes, Robert B., and Sholom, Sergey. 2017. "Retrospective Imaging and Characterization of Nuclear Material". United States. doi:10.1097/HP.0000000000000680. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1438211.
@article{osti_1438211,
title = {Retrospective Imaging and Characterization of Nuclear Material},
author = {Hayes, Robert B. and Sholom, Sergey},
abstractNote = {Modern techniques for detection of covert nuclear ma-terial requires some combination of real time measurement and/or sampling of the material. More common is real time measure-ment of the ionizing emission caused by radioactive decay or through the materials measured in response to external interroga-tion radiation. One can expose the suspect material with various radiation types, including high energy photons such as x rays or with larger particles such as neutrons and muons, to obtain images or measure nuclear reactions induced in the material. Stand-off detection using imaging modalities similar to those in the medical field can be accomplished, or simple collimated detec-tors can be used to localize radioactive materials. In all such cases, the common feature is that some or all of the nuclear materials have to be present for the measurement, which makes sense; as one might ask, “How you can measure something that is not there?” The current work and results show how to do exactly that: characterize nuclear materials after they have been removed from an area leaving no chemical trace. This new approach is demon-strated to be fully capable of providing both previous source spa-tial distribution and emission energy grouping. The technique uses magnetic resonance for organic insulators and/or lumines-cence techniques on ubiquitous refractory materials similar in theory to the way the nuclear industry carries out worker person-nel dosimetry. Spatial information is obtained by acquiring gridded samples for dosimetric measurements, while energy infor-mation comes through dose depth profile results that are func-tions of the incident radiation energies.},
doi = {10.1097/HP.0000000000000680},
journal = {Health Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 113,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {8}
}