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Title: Adaptation to elevated CO 2 in different biodiversity contexts

Abstract

In the absence of migration, species persistence depends on adaption to a changing environment, but whether and how adaptation to global change is altered by community diversity is not understood. Community diversity may prevent, enhance or alter how species adapt to changing conditions by influencing population sizes, genetic diversity and/or the fitness landscape experienced by focal species. For this study, we tested the impact of community diversity on adaptation by performing a reciprocal transplant experiment on grasses that evolved for 14 years under ambient and elevated CO 2, in communities of low or high species richness. Using biomass as a fitness proxy, we find evidence for local adaptation to elevated CO 2, but only for plants assayed in a community of similar diversity to the one experienced during the period of selection. Our results indicate that the biological community shapes the very nature of the fitness landscape within which species evolve in response to elevated CO 2.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Zoology and Biodiversity Research Center
  2. Western Sydney Univ., Penrith (Australia). Hawkesbury Inst. for the Environment; Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Forest Resources
  3. Sherbrooke Univ. (Canada). Dept. of Biology
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23). Climate and Environmental Sciences Division; Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC); National Science Foundation (NSF); Western Sydney Univ., Penrith (Australia)
OSTI Identifier:
1438021
Grant/Contract Number:  
FG02-96ER62291; DEB-0080382; DEB-0620652; DEB-1234162; DEB-0322057; DEB-0716587; DEB-1242531; DEB-1120064; FC02-06ER64158
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; biodiversity; community ecology; evolutionary ecology

Citation Formats

Kleynhans, Elizabeth J., Otto, Sarah P., Reich, Peter B., and Vellend, Mark. Adaptation to elevated CO2 in different biodiversity contexts. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1038/ncomms12358.
Kleynhans, Elizabeth J., Otto, Sarah P., Reich, Peter B., & Vellend, Mark. Adaptation to elevated CO2 in different biodiversity contexts. United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms12358.
Kleynhans, Elizabeth J., Otto, Sarah P., Reich, Peter B., and Vellend, Mark. Thu . "Adaptation to elevated CO2 in different biodiversity contexts". United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms12358. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1438021.
@article{osti_1438021,
title = {Adaptation to elevated CO2 in different biodiversity contexts},
author = {Kleynhans, Elizabeth J. and Otto, Sarah P. and Reich, Peter B. and Vellend, Mark},
abstractNote = {In the absence of migration, species persistence depends on adaption to a changing environment, but whether and how adaptation to global change is altered by community diversity is not understood. Community diversity may prevent, enhance or alter how species adapt to changing conditions by influencing population sizes, genetic diversity and/or the fitness landscape experienced by focal species. For this study, we tested the impact of community diversity on adaptation by performing a reciprocal transplant experiment on grasses that evolved for 14 years under ambient and elevated CO2, in communities of low or high species richness. Using biomass as a fitness proxy, we find evidence for local adaptation to elevated CO2, but only for plants assayed in a community of similar diversity to the one experienced during the period of selection. Our results indicate that the biological community shapes the very nature of the fitness landscape within which species evolve in response to elevated CO2.},
doi = {10.1038/ncomms12358},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = ,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {8}
}

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Cited by: 7 works
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Works referenced in this record:

Data from: Adaptation to elevated CO2 in different biodiversity contexts
dataset, August 2016

  • Kleynhans, Elizabeth J.; Otto, Sarah P.; Reich, Peter B.
  • Dryad Digital Repository-Supplementary information for journal article at DOI: 10.1038/ncomms12358, 1 CSV file (57.97 Kb)
  • DOI: 10.5061/dryad.s4bt7

    Works referencing / citing this record:

    Data from: Adaptation to elevated CO2 in different biodiversity contexts
    dataset, August 2016

    • Kleynhans, Elizabeth J.; Otto, Sarah P.; Reich, Peter B.
    • Dryad Digital Repository-Supplementary information for journal article at DOI: 10.1038/ncomms12358, 1 CSV file (57.97 Kb)
    • DOI: 10.5061/dryad.s4bt7