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This content will become publicly available on May 5, 2019

Title: Spillover systems in a telecoupled Anthropocene: typology, methods, and governance for global sustainability

The world has become increasingly telecoupled through distant flows of information, energy, people, organisms, goods, and matter. Recent advances suggest that telecouplings such as trade and species invasion often generate spillover systems with profound effects. To untangle spillover complexity, we make the first attempt to develop a typology of spillover systems based on six criteria: flows from and to sending and receiving systems, distances from sending and receiving systems, types of spillover effects, sizes of spillover systems, roles of agents in spillover systems, and the origin of spillover systems. Furthermore, we highlight a portfolio of qualitative and quantitative methods for detecting the often-overlooked spillover systems. To effectively govern spillover systems for global sustainability, we also propose an overall goal (minimize negative and maximize positive spillover effects) and three general principles (fairness, responsibility, and capability).
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [1] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7] ;  [8] ;  [9] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [10] ;  [11] ;  [12] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [13] more »;  [14] ;  [15] ;  [9] ;  [1] « less
  1. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability and Dept. of Fisheries and Wildlife
  2. Brazilian Agricultural Research Corp. (Embrapa), Brasilia (Brazil); Univ. of Campinas (Brazil). Center for Environmental Studies and Research
  3. Leuphana Univ. of Luneburg (Germany). Research Group on Governance-Participation and Sustainability; Lincoln Univ. and Univ. of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand). Waterways Centre for Freshwater Management
  4. Humboldt Univ. of Berlin (Germany). IRI THESys and Geography Dept.
  5. King's College London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geography
  6. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division
  7. Univ. of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO (United States). Environmental and Sustainability Studies
  8. Univ. of Campinas (Brazil). Center for Environmental Studies and Research
  9. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Dept. of Fisheries and Wildlife and Michigan Sea Grant
  10. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Earth and Environmental Systems Inst. (EESI), GeoSyntheSES Lab (Geographic Syntheses for Social Ecological Sustainability) and Dept. of Geography
  11. Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AL (United States). EWHALE Lab-Inst. of Arctic Biology and Biology & Wildlife Dept.
  12. The Nature Conservancy, New York City, NY (United States). New York City Program
  13. Univ. of Osnabruck (Germany). Jean-Monnet-Chair of European Integration
  14. Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science
  15. Leuphana Univ. of Luneburg (Germany). Research Group on Governance-Participation and Sustainability
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725; 1518518; NNX10AD19G
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 1877-3435
Publisher:
Elsevier
Research Org:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE); National Science Foundation (NSF); National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA); Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 96 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT AND PRESERVATION
OSTI Identifier:
1437890