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Title: Rare earth minerals in a “no tonstein” section of the Dean (Fire Clay) coal, Knox County, Kentucky

The Dean (Fire Clay) coal in Knox County, Kentucky, does not contain the megascopically-visible ash-fall tonstein present in most other sections of the coal bed. Like the Fire Clay tonstein, a low-ash portion of the coal is enriched in rare earth elements (>2400 ppm, on ash basis). In addition to kaolinite produced in the diagenesis of volcanic glass, transmission electron microscopy studies indicate the coal contains primary kaolinite, LaCeNdTh monazite, barium niobate, native gold, and FeNiCr spinels. The mineral assemblages, particularly the kaolinite-monazite association and its similarity to the tonsteins in coal to the east, demonstrate the coal was subject to the REE-enriched volcanic ash fall, apparently just at a more dilute level than at locations where the tonstein is present.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4]
  1. Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research
  2. Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States). National Center for Earth and Environmental Nanotechnology
  3. Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Geosciences; Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Subsurface Science and Technology Group
  4. Kentucky Science and Technology Corporation, Lexington, KY (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-134603
Journal ID: ISSN 0166-5162; PII: S0039914018304879
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Coal Geology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 193; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0166-5162
Publisher:
Elsevier
Research Org:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT
OSTI Identifier:
1437021

Hower, James C., Berti, Debora, Hochella, Michael F., and Mardon, Sarah M.. Rare earth minerals in a “no tonstein” section of the Dean (Fire Clay) coal, Knox County, Kentucky. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1016/j.coal.2018.05.001.
Hower, James C., Berti, Debora, Hochella, Michael F., & Mardon, Sarah M.. Rare earth minerals in a “no tonstein” section of the Dean (Fire Clay) coal, Knox County, Kentucky. United States. doi:10.1016/j.coal.2018.05.001.
Hower, James C., Berti, Debora, Hochella, Michael F., and Mardon, Sarah M.. 2018. "Rare earth minerals in a “no tonstein” section of the Dean (Fire Clay) coal, Knox County, Kentucky". United States. doi:10.1016/j.coal.2018.05.001.
@article{osti_1437021,
title = {Rare earth minerals in a “no tonstein” section of the Dean (Fire Clay) coal, Knox County, Kentucky},
author = {Hower, James C. and Berti, Debora and Hochella, Michael F. and Mardon, Sarah M.},
abstractNote = {The Dean (Fire Clay) coal in Knox County, Kentucky, does not contain the megascopically-visible ash-fall tonstein present in most other sections of the coal bed. Like the Fire Clay tonstein, a low-ash portion of the coal is enriched in rare earth elements (>2400 ppm, on ash basis). In addition to kaolinite produced in the diagenesis of volcanic glass, transmission electron microscopy studies indicate the coal contains primary kaolinite, LaCeNdTh monazite, barium niobate, native gold, and FeNiCr spinels. The mineral assemblages, particularly the kaolinite-monazite association and its similarity to the tonsteins in coal to the east, demonstrate the coal was subject to the REE-enriched volcanic ash fall, apparently just at a more dilute level than at locations where the tonstein is present.},
doi = {10.1016/j.coal.2018.05.001},
journal = {International Journal of Coal Geology},
number = C,
volume = 193,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {5}
}