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Title: Atomically Visualizing Elemental Segregation-Induced Surface Alloying and Restructuring

Using in situ transmission electron microscopy that spatially and temporally resolves the evolution of the atomic structure in the surface and subsurface regions, we Find that the surface segregation of Au atoms in a Cu(Au) solid solution results in the nucleation and growth of a (2 × 1) missing-row reconstructed, half-unit-cell thick L1 2 Cu 3Au(110) surface alloy. Our in situ electron microscopy observations and atomistic simulations demonstrate that the (2 × 1) reconstruction of the Cu 3Au(110) surface alloy remains as a stable surface structure as a result of the favored Cu-Au diatom configuration.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ; ORCiD logo [4] ; ORCiD logo [3] ; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Binghamton Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science and Engineering Program
  2. Binghamton Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy & Materials Science and Engineering Program
  3. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)
  4. Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
BNL-203605-2018-JAAM
Journal ID: ISSN 1948-7185
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012704; ACI-1548562; AC02-06CH11357
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 24; Journal ID: ISSN 1948-7185
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Research Org:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); National Science Foundation (NSF)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Segregation; Alloying; transmission electron microscopy; reconstruction; atomic structure; atomistic simulation; surface termination
OSTI Identifier:
1436256

Zou, Lianfeng, Li, Jonathan, Zakharov, Dmitri, Saidi, Wissam A., Stach, Eric A., and Zhou, Guangwen. Atomically Visualizing Elemental Segregation-Induced Surface Alloying and Restructuring. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1021/acs.jpclett.7b02947.
Zou, Lianfeng, Li, Jonathan, Zakharov, Dmitri, Saidi, Wissam A., Stach, Eric A., & Zhou, Guangwen. Atomically Visualizing Elemental Segregation-Induced Surface Alloying and Restructuring. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.jpclett.7b02947.
Zou, Lianfeng, Li, Jonathan, Zakharov, Dmitri, Saidi, Wissam A., Stach, Eric A., and Zhou, Guangwen. 2017. "Atomically Visualizing Elemental Segregation-Induced Surface Alloying and Restructuring". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.jpclett.7b02947.
@article{osti_1436256,
title = {Atomically Visualizing Elemental Segregation-Induced Surface Alloying and Restructuring},
author = {Zou, Lianfeng and Li, Jonathan and Zakharov, Dmitri and Saidi, Wissam A. and Stach, Eric A. and Zhou, Guangwen},
abstractNote = {Using in situ transmission electron microscopy that spatially and temporally resolves the evolution of the atomic structure in the surface and subsurface regions, we Find that the surface segregation of Au atoms in a Cu(Au) solid solution results in the nucleation and growth of a (2 × 1) missing-row reconstructed, half-unit-cell thick L12 Cu3Au(110) surface alloy. Our in situ electron microscopy observations and atomistic simulations demonstrate that the (2 × 1) reconstruction of the Cu3Au(110) surface alloy remains as a stable surface structure as a result of the favored Cu-Au diatom configuration.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.jpclett.7b02947},
journal = {Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters},
number = 24,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}